Skip to main content

(In)Digitizing Cáuigú Historical Geographies: Technoscience as a Postcolonial Discourse

Abstract

The primary thesis of this essay is that technology and society co-construct one another. The dynamics of co-construction are often encountered by scholars who conduct research on the rights of indigenous peoples, indigenous knowledge, media, mapping, the social impacts of geographic information systems (GIS), science and technology studies, history of technology, indigenous linguistics, English, and film studies. We often find ourselves working ‘in-between’ dialogues, mediating indigenous geographies, negotiation research agendas, incorporating social theories, relying heavily upon the humanities, and representing geographies using digital technologies. For some of us, the projects are modest. Issues of data source uncertainty, how GIS handles temporal data, and the GIS leanings toward quantified data are all important issues. However, we are never removed from the web of colonial or postcolonial histories; reminded how cartographers, ethnographers, and historians constructed historical geographies for Indigenous people in the past; and the processes that contributed the historical condition of American Indians and how we should approach modern histories that involve researching and writing about Indigenous people. Some scholars have adopted frameworks that highlight the hybridity of systems, the blending of ideas, and contradictory spaces making up American Indian historical geographies.

Keywords

  • Geographic Information System
  • Indigenous People
  • Actor Network
  • Indigenous Community
  • Indigenous Knowledge

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-94-007-5009-8_4
  • Chapter length: 20 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-94-007-5009-8
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   139.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   179.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Notes

  1. 1.

    Pickles (1995), Curry (1998), Rundstrom (1995) and Sheppard (1995).

  2. 2.

    Harvey and Chrisman (1998) and Harvey (2001).

  3. 3.

    Harris and Weiner (1998), Craig et al. (2002) and Sieber (2006).

  4. 4.

    Pearce (2008), Pearce and Louis (2008) and Pearce and Hermann (2010).

  5. 5.

    Palmer (2012a).

  6. 6.

    Leavy (2007), Inglebert et al. (2007), Holton et al. (2007), Sugito and Kubota (2007) and Palmer (2012a).

  7. 7.

    Harvey and Chrisman (1998), Harvey (2000) and Schuurman (2000).

  8. 8.

    Palmer and Hanney (2010), Palmer (2009) and Martin (2000).

References

  • Basso K (1996) Wisdom sits in places: landscape and language among the Western Apache. University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque

    Google Scholar 

  • Bijker WE, Hughes TP, Pinch T (eds) (1987) The social construction of technological systems. New directions in the sociology and history of technology. MIT, Cambridge

    Google Scholar 

  • Bray F (1997) Technology and gender: fabrics of power in late imperial China. University of California Press, Berkeley

    Google Scholar 

  • Brey P (2003) Theorizing modernity and technology. In: Misa TJ, Brey P, Feenberg A (eds) In modernity and technology. MIT, Cambridge, pp 33–72

    Google Scholar 

  • Cajete G (2000) Native science. Clear Light Publishing, Santa Fe

    Google Scholar 

  • Callon M (1986) Some elements of a sociology of translation: domestication of the scallops and the fishermen of St Brieuc Bay. In: Law J (ed) Power, action, belief: a new sociology of knowledge? Routledge, London, pp 196–233

    Google Scholar 

  • Callon M (1991) Techno-economic networks and irreversibility. In: Law J (ed) A sociology of monsters. Routledge, New York, pp 132–164

    Google Scholar 

  • Craig W, Harris T, Weiner D (eds) (2002) Community participation and geographic information systems. Taylor & Francis, London

    Google Scholar 

  • Crampton J (2010) Mapping: a critical introduction to cartography and GIS. Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford

    Google Scholar 

  • Curry M (1998) Digital places: living with geographic information technologies. Routledge, London

    Google Scholar 

  • Dyson L, Hendriks M, Grant S (eds) (2007) Information technology and indigenous people. Idea Group Publishing, Hershey

    Google Scholar 

  • Goodchild M (2007) Citizens as sensors: the world of volunteered geography. GeoJournal 69:211–221

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Greene C (2009) One hundred summer: a Kiowa calendar record. University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln

    Google Scholar 

  • Gregory IS, Ell PS (2007) Historical GIS: technologies, methodologies and scholarship. Cambridge studies in historical geography. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harley B (1989) Deconstructing the map. Cartographica 26(2):1–20

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harris T, Weiner D (1998) Empowerment, marginalization and “community-integrated” GIS. Cartogr Geogr Inf Syst 25(2):67–76

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harvey F (2000) The social construction of geographic information systems. Int J Geogr Inf Sci 14(8):711–713

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harvey F (2001) Constructing GIS: actor networks of collaboration. URISA 13(1):29–38

    Google Scholar 

  • Harvey F, Chrisman N (1998) Boundary objects and the social construction of GIS technology. Environ Plan A 30:1683–1694

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Holton G, Berez A, Williams S (2007) Building the Dena’ina language Alaska archive. In: Dyson L, Hendriks M, Grant S (eds) Information technology and indigenous people. Idea Group Publishing, Hershey, pp 205–209

    Google Scholar 

  • Inglebert E, Banks S, Pavel D, Friedlander R, Stone M (2007) Multimedia curriculum development based on the oral tradition. In: Dyson L, Hendriks M, Grant S (eds) Information technology and indigenous people. Idea Group Publishing, Hershey, pp 123–125

    Google Scholar 

  • Knowles A (2005) Emerging trend in historical GIS. Hist Geogr 33:7–13

    Google Scholar 

  • Laituri M (2011) Indigenous peoples’ issues and indigenous uses of GIS. In: Nyerges TL, Couclelis H, McMaster R (eds) The SAGE handbook of GIS and society. Sage, London, pp 202–211

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Latour B (1987) Science in action: how to follow scientists and engineers through society. Harvard University Press, Cambridge

    Google Scholar 

  • Latour B (1991) Technology is society made durable. In: Law J (ed) A sociology of monsters. Routledge, New York, pp 103–131

    Google Scholar 

  • Latour B (2005) Reassembling the social: an introduction to actor-network-theory. Oxford University Press, Oxford

    Google Scholar 

  • Law J (ed) (1991) A sociology of monsters. Routledge, New York

    Google Scholar 

  • Law J (1999) After ANT: complexity, naming and topology. In: Law J, Hassard J (eds) Actor network theory and after. Blackwell, Oxford, pp 1–14

    Google Scholar 

  • Leavy B (2007) Digital songlines: digitizing the arts, culture and heritage. In: Dyson L, Hendriks M, Grant S (eds) Information technology and indigenous people. Idea Group Publishing, Hershey, pp 159–169

    Google Scholar 

  • Lewis G (1998) Cartographic encounters: perspectives on native American mapmaking and map use. University of Chicago Press, Chicago

    Google Scholar 

  • Lippard L (1992) Partial recall: photographs of native Americans. New Press, New York

    Google Scholar 

  • Mark D, Turk A (2003) Landscape categories in Yindjibarndi: ontology, environment, and language. In: Kuhn W, Worboys MF, Timpf S (eds) Spatial information theory: foundations of geographic information science, international conference, COSIT 2003, Ittingen, September 24–28, 2003, Lecture notes in computer science, vol 2825. Springer, Heidelberg, pp 28–45

    Google Scholar 

  • Martin E (2000) Actor-networks and implementation: examples from conservation GIS in Ecuador. Int J Geogr Inf Sci 14(8):715–738

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Momaday N (1969) The way to rainy mountain. University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque

    Google Scholar 

  • Murdoch J (1995) Actor-networks and the evolution of economic forms: combining description and explanation in theories of regulation, flexible specialisation, and networks. Environ Plan A 27:731–757

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Murdoch J (2006) Poststructuralist geographies: a guide to relational space. SAGE, London

    Google Scholar 

  • Palmer G (2003) Telling stories the Kiowa way. University of Arizona Press, Tuscon

    Google Scholar 

  • Palmer M (2009) Engaging with indigital geographic information networks. Futures 41:33–40

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Palmer M (2012a) Theorizing indigital geographic information networks. Cartographica 47(2): 80–91

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Palmer M (2012b) Cartographic encounters at the BIA GIS center of calculation. Am Indian Cult Res J 36(2):75–102

    Google Scholar 

  • Palmer M, Hanney J (2010) Geographic information networks in American Indian governments and communities. Int J Virtual Communities Soc Netw 2(2):1–10

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Palmer M, Rundstrom R (2013) GIS, Internal Colonialism, and the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs. Annals of the Association of American Geographers. In press

    Google Scholar 

  • Pearce M (2008) Framing the days: place and narrative in cartography. Cartogr Geogr Inf Sci 35(1):17–32

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pearce M, Hermann M (2010) Mapping Champlain’s travels: restorative techniques for historical cartography. Cartographica 45(1):33–48

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pearce M, Louis R (2008) Mapping indigenous depth of place. Am Indian Cult Res J 32(3):107–126. special Issue: “Mainstreaming Indigenous Geographies”

    Google Scholar 

  • Pickles J (1995) Ground truth: the social implications of geographic information systems. Guilford Press, New York

    Google Scholar 

  • Robins P (2003) Beyond ground truth: GIS and the environmental knowledge of herders, professional foresters, and other traditional communities. Hum Ecol 31(2):233–253

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rundstrom R (1995) GIS, indigenous peoples, and epistemological diversity. Cartogr Geogr Inf Syst 22:45–57

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sappington N (2008) Tribal GIS: supporting native American policies with GIS. ESRI, Redlands

    Google Scholar 

  • Schuurman N (2000) Trouble in the heartland: GIS and its critics in the 1990s. Prog Hum Geogr 24(4):569–590

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sharp J (2009) Geographies of postcolonialism. SAGE, London

    Google Scholar 

  • Sheppard E (1995) GIS and society: towards a research agenda. Cartogr Geogr Inf Syst 22(1):5–16

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sheppard E, Couclelis H, Graham S, Harrington JW, Onsrud H (1999) Geographies of the information society. Int J Geogr Inf Sci 13(8):797–823

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sieber R (2006) Public participation geographic information systems: a literature review and framework. Ann Assoc Am Geogr 96(3):491–507

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sieber R, Wellen C (2008) Blending participatory GIS and geo-spatial ontologies for indigenous knowledge preservation. http://www.emse.fr/site/SAGEO2007/CDROM/CQFD14.pdf

  • Smith L (1999) Decolonizing methodologies: research and indigenous people. Zed Books, London

    Google Scholar 

  • Soja E (1996) Thirdspace: journey to Los Angeles and other real-and-imagined places. Polity Press, Oxford

    Google Scholar 

  • Sugito S, Kubota S (2007) Alliance project: digital kinship database and genealogy. In: Dyson L, Hendriks M, Grant S (eds) Information technology and indigenous people. Idea Group Publishing, Hershey, pp 260–265

    Google Scholar 

  • Warhus M (1997) Another America: native American maps and the history of our land. St. Martin’s Press, New York

    Google Scholar 

  • Winner L (1980) Do artifacts have politics? Daedalus 109:121–136

    Google Scholar 

  • Wood D (2010) Rethinking the power of maps. Guilford Press, New York

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Mark H. Palmer .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Palmer, M.H. (2013). (In)Digitizing Cáuigú Historical Geographies: Technoscience as a Postcolonial Discourse. In: von Lünen, A., Travis, C. (eds) History and GIS. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-5009-8_4

Download citation