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Criteria of Possible Habitability of Earthlike Exoplanets

  • Leonid V. Ksanfomality
Chapter
Part of the Cellular Origin, Life in Extreme Habitats and Astrobiology book series (COLE, volume 24)

Abstract

The end of twentieth and the beginning of twenty-first century were marked by the discovery of extrasolar planets that had been awaited for a long time. By the beginning of 2010, their number had exceeded 400. Some of the planets found have low masses exceeding the terrestrial mass only severalfold. It is suggested that some of them may have a global ocean. This chapter is focused on the study of physical conditions an Earthlike planet should possess to be suitable for the advent, evolution and existence of life. Very narrow intervals of many physical parameters are required for the advent of amino-nucleic-acid form of life on a planet of terrestrial type: first of all, its mass and temperature conditions, together with many other parameters that form complex many dimensional labyrinths. There are reasons to suggest that only the planets the host stars of which are of moderate age and spectral classes from the late subclasses F up to the early subclasses K can be suitable for life. Only very favorable combinations of many parameters of a planet can provide the conditions required for the evolution of the arisen life into multicellular forms. The planet should have a mass of about 5E27 g, zones with the interval of ambient temperatures comfortable for biosphere, an atmosphere capable to absorb hard external radiation, moderate level of gravitation on the planet, and a number of other characteristics necessary for the advent and evolution of life.

Keywords

Greenhouse Effect Semimajor Axis Terrestrial Planet Extrasolar Planet Planetary Mass 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of ScienceMoscowRussia

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