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Excursus: Capacity Construction and Capacity Destruction – Whose Capacities Development Cooperation Builds Upon?

  • Peter K. Aurenhammer
Chapter
Part of the World Forests book series (WFSE, volume 13)

Abstract

Building on empirical results from forest development policy and project analysis and on theoretical approaches (among others Bourdieu’s habitus and field theory), this chapter engages in a theoretical discussion. It argues that capacities are present in any society, in contrast to Prittwitz’s assumption, but the influential actors of development cooperation aim to facilitate change in social entities and in their interrelation to forests, through networks. Thereby, they construct new capacities, while others are subsequently destructed. The potential of actors, involved in various fields, to do so depends largely on their capacities (i.e. knowledge). They act in networks, which determine their influence. Quantitative and qualitative empirical results show that governmental actors do obtain the highest influence. Starting from a successful, initial contact between two fields, three phases of knowledge transfer can be made distinct and empirically founded. Finally, building on empirical research, a typology of mechanisms of change has been derived, showing the variety of social niches in which an actor can contribute to change.

Keywords

Recipient Country Social Innovation Community Forestry Development Cooperation Social Entity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter K. Aurenhammer
    • 1
  1. 1.Chair of Forest and Nature Conservation PolicyGeorg-August-University of GöttingenGöttingenGermany

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