Advertisement

Methodological Approach, Definitions and Selection of Empiricism

  • Peter K. Aurenhammer
Chapter
Part of the World Forests book series (WFSE, volume 13)

Abstract

Bilateral, bi-governmental development cooperation in forestry, in other words development cooperation agreed upon between a donor’s and a recipient’s governmental institutions, is practised already for many decades. However, many problems, such as deforestation and forest degradation, have to date been tackled with limited success.

Keywords

Foreign Policy Recipient Country Sustainable Forest Management Donor Country Normative Concept 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Amin S (1976) Imperialism and unequal development. Harvester Press, HassocksGoogle Scholar
  2. Arts B, van Tatenhove J (2004) Policy and power: a conceptual framework between the ‘old’ and ‘new’ policy idioms. Policy Sci 37(3–4):339–356CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Aurenhammer PK (2008) Analyse der forstlichen Entwicklungspolitik und Ableitung von möglichen Handlungsfeldern für Österreich (Arbeitstitel), TEIL A: Ergebnisse aus der Analyse von Sekundärdaten. BMLFUW, Wien (Analyses of forest related development cooperation policy and suggestions for innovative solutions for future policies, Part A: Results from the analyses of secondary data, scientific report to the BMLFUW. German, executive summary in English)Google Scholar
  4. Aurenhammer PK (2010) Analyse der forstlichen Entwicklungspolitik und Ableitung von möglichen Handlungsfeldern für Österreich, Endbericht. BMLFUW, Wien (Analyses of forest related development cooperation policy and suggestions for innovative solutions for future policies, final scientific report, including qualitative results, to the Austrian Federal Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, Environment and Water Management. BMLFUW. German, executive summary in English)Google Scholar
  5. Aurenhammer PK (2011) European states’ bilateral foreign aid policy in forestry, a policy field analyses of Austrian, Finnish, German and Swedish forestry aid, with emphasis on program formulation and implementation. Dissertation, Georg-August-University Göttingen, GöttingenGoogle Scholar
  6. Bachrach P, Baratz M (1977) Macht und Armut. Eine theoretisch-empirische Untersuchung. Suhrkamp, FrankfurtGoogle Scholar
  7. Bahuguna VK (2009) Community forestry in Asia: a review of policy and programmes. In: CFIW (ed) Thinking globally – acting locally, community forestry in the international arena. Proceedings of the community international workshop, 15–18 September 2009, Pokhara, pp 9–11, 45–51Google Scholar
  8. Bello W (2002) Deglobalization: ideas for a new world economy. Zed Books, LondonGoogle Scholar
  9. Biel R (2000) The new imperialism. Crisis and contradictions in north/south relations. Zed Books, LondonGoogle Scholar
  10. Blanda H (2009) Handlungsmöglichkeiten forstwirtschaftlicher Akteure in der Gemeinde Raichraming, Vorarbeiten zu einer agentenbasierten Modellierung. Diplomarbeit, Universität, WienGoogle Scholar
  11. Boris D (2001) Zur Politischen Ökonomie Lateinamerikas. Der Kontinent in der Weltwirtschaft des 20. Jahrhunderts. VSA-Verlag, HamburgGoogle Scholar
  12. Boulding KE (1989) Three faces of power. Sage Publications, Newbury ParkGoogle Scholar
  13. Bourdieu P (1987) Die feinen Unterschiede. Kritik der gesellschaftlichen Urteilskraft. Suhrkamp, Frankfurt/MainGoogle Scholar
  14. Bourdieu P (1993) Sozialer Sinn. Kritik der theoretischen Vernunft. Suhrkamp, Frankfurt/MainGoogle Scholar
  15. Bourdieu P (1998) Praktische Vernunft. Zur Theorie des Handelns. Suhrkamp, Frankfurt/MainGoogle Scholar
  16. Bourdieu P (2001) Das politische Feld: Zur Kritik der politischen Vernunft. UVK, KonstanzGoogle Scholar
  17. Burckhardt CJ (1935) Richelieu. Der Aufstieg zur Macht, Bd 1. D. W. Callwey, MünchenGoogle Scholar
  18. CFIW (2009) Thinking globally – acting locally, community forestry in the international arena. Proceedings of the community international workshop, 15–18 September 2009, PokharaGoogle Scholar
  19. Cheneval F (2006) Property rights as human rights. In: De Soto H, Cheneval F (eds) Realizing property rights, vol 1, Swiss human rights book. Rüffer & Rub, Zürich, pp 11–17Google Scholar
  20. Clegg SA (1989) Frameworks of power. Sage Publications, LondonGoogle Scholar
  21. Dahl RA (1957) The concept of power. Behav Sci 2(3):201–215CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Dargavel J, Hobley M, Kengen S (1985) Forestry of development and underdevelopment of forestry. In: Dargavel J, Simpson G (eds) Forestry: success or failure in development countries? pp 1–37, CRES working paper 1985/20, Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies, Australian National University, CanberraGoogle Scholar
  23. Deutsch KM (1963) The nerves of government: models of political communication and control. The Free Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  24. Devkota RR (2010) Interest and power as drivers of community forestry. Dissertation, Georg-August-University Göttingen, GöttingenGoogle Scholar
  25. Dye T (1976) Policy analysis: what governments do, why they do it and what difference it makes. University of Alabama Press, TuscaloosaGoogle Scholar
  26. Emmanuel A (1969) L’échange inégal: Essais sur les antagonismes dans les rapports économiques internationaux. François Maspero, ParisGoogle Scholar
  27. Eßer K et al (1994) Systemische Wettbewerbsfähigkeit: Neue Anforderungen and Unternehmen und Politik. Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  28. Esteva G (1992) Fiesta – jenseits von Entwicklung, Hilfe und Politik. Brandes & Apsel, Frankfurt a. MGoogle Scholar
  29. Etzioni A (1975) A comparative analysis of complex organizations. On power, involvement, and their correlates. Free Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  30. FAO (1949/1950) Proceedings of the III world forestry congress, no 1–4. HelsinkiGoogle Scholar
  31. Farley KA (2010) Pathways to forest transition: local case studies from the Ecuadorian Andes. Published by Conference of Latin Americanist Geographers. J Lat Am Geog 9(2):7–26Google Scholar
  32. Feldbauer P, Parnreiter C (1999) Mexiko: Krisen und Entwicklungschancen. Sind die großen Depressionen und die Globalisierungskrise vergleichbar? In: Feldbauer P, Hardach G, Melinz G (eds) Von der Weltwirtschaftskrise zur Globalisierungskrise (1929-1999). Wohin treibt die Peripherie. Brandes&Aspel/Südwind, Frankfurt am Main/Wien, pp 183–209Google Scholar
  33. Fischer K, Fischer K, Maral-Hanak I, Hödl G, Parnreiter C (eds) (2004) Entwicklung und Unterentwicklung. Eine Einführung in Probleme, Theorien und Strategien. Mandelbaum, WienGoogle Scholar
  34. Fuchs-Heinritz W et al (1994) Lexikon zur Soziologie. Westdeutscher Verlag, OpladenCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Galloway G, Katila P, Krug J (2010) The need for new strategies and approaches. In: Mery G, Katila P, Galloway G, Alfaro RI, Kanninen M, Lobovikov M, Varjo J (eds) Forests and society – responding to global drivers of change, vol 25, IUFRO world series. IUFRO, Vienna, pp 489–499Google Scholar
  36. Galtung J (1997) Der Preis der Modernisierung. ProMedia, WienGoogle Scholar
  37. Gaventa Y (1980) Power and powerlessness: quiescence and rebellion in an Appalachian valley. University of Illinois Press, UrbanaGoogle Scholar
  38. George S (2001) Clusters of crisis and a planetary contract. Transnational Institute. http://www.tni.org/archives/act/1435. Accessed 10 May 2011
  39. Giddens A (1984) The constitution of society: outline of the theory of structuration. University of California Press, BerkeleyGoogle Scholar
  40. Giddens A (1997) Die Konstitution der Gesellschaft. Grundzüge einer Theorie der Strukturierung. Band 1. Campus, Frankfurt/New YorkGoogle Scholar
  41. Giddens A (2009) Sociology, 6th edn. Polity Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  42. Gotschi E (2007) Worte als Speicher der Geschichte. Ein Deutungsversuch zu den Begriffen ‘Entwicklung und ‘Entwicklungszusammenarbeit’. In: Gotschi E, Hunger A, Zapotoczky K (eds) Politik – Programme – Projekte, Menschenorientierte Entwicklungszusammenarbeit im Sinne von Bourdieu. Trauner Verlag, Linz, pp 35–48Google Scholar
  43. Gotschi E, Zach M, Vogel S (2007) Soziale Innovationen als Ergebnis von Projektinterventionen. Analyse zweier Initiativen im Distrik Búzi, Mosambik. In: Gotschi E, Hunger A, Zapotoczky K (eds) Politik – Programme – Projekte, Menschenorientierte Entwicklungszusammenarbeit im Sinne von Bourdieu. Trauner Verlag, Linz, pp 81–100Google Scholar
  44. Grainger A (1995) The forest transition: an alternative approach. Area 27(3):242–251Google Scholar
  45. Haas PM (1992) Banning chlorofluorocarbons: epistemic community efforts to protect stratospheric ozone. Int Organ 46(1) Knowledge, Power and International Policy Coordination, Winter 1992:187–224Google Scholar
  46. Hannerz U (1992) Cultural complexity: studies in the social organization of meaning. Columbia University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  47. Hasanagas ND (2004) Power factor typology through organizational and network analysis – using environmental policy networks as an illustration. Dissertation, Georg-August-University GöttingenGoogle Scholar
  48. Heinelt H (2009) Machen Besonderheiten von Policies einen Unterschied? In: Schubert K, Bandelow NC (eds) Lehrbuch der Politikfeldanalyse 2.0. Oldenburg Verlag, München, pp 115–130Google Scholar
  49. Hirschman AO (1958) The strategy of economic development. Yale University Press, New HavenGoogle Scholar
  50. Höll O (2006) Entwicklungspolitik. In: Dachs H (ed) Politik in Österreich. Manz, Wien, pp 884–904Google Scholar
  51. Howlett M, Ramesh M (2003) Studying public policy: policy cycles and policy subsystems, 2nd edn. Oxford University Press, Don Mills (a.o.)Google Scholar
  52. Howlett M, Ramesh M, Perl A (2009) Studying public policy: policy cycles and policy subsystems, 3rd edn. Oxford University Press, Ontario (a.o.)Google Scholar
  53. Jahn D (2006) Einführung in die vergleichende Politikwissenschaft. VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften, WiesbadenCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Jann W, Wegrich K (2009) Phasenmodelle und Politikprozesse: Der Policy Cycle. In: Schubert K, Bandelow NC (eds) Lehrbuch der Politikfeldanalyse 2.0. Oldenburg Verlag, München, pp 75–114Google Scholar
  55. Khan MK (ed) (1980) Self-Reliance als nationale und kollektive Entwicklungsstrategie. Weltforum-Verlag, MünchenGoogle Scholar
  56. Kolland F (2004) Zwischen Fortschrittsoptimismus und kritischer Gesellschaftsanalyse. (Between optimism for progress and critical analysis of society) In: Fischer K, Maral-Hanak I, Hödl G, Parnreiter C (eds) Entwicklung und Unterentwicklung. Eine Einführung in Probleme, Theorien und Strategien. Mandelbaum, WienGoogle Scholar
  57. Komlosy A (2004) Das Werden der ‘Dritten Welt’. (The making of the Third World) In: Fischer K, Maral-Hanak I, Hödl G, Parnreiter C (eds) Entwicklung und Unterentwicklung. Eine Einführung in Probleme, Theorien und Strategien. Mandelbaum, WienGoogle Scholar
  58. Kreff F (2003) Grundkonzepte der Sozial- und Kulturanthropologie in der Globalisierungsdebatte. Dietrich Reimer Verlag, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  59. Krippendorff E (2000) Kritik der Außenpolitik. Suhrkamp, Frankfurt am MainGoogle Scholar
  60. Krott M (2005) Forest policy analysis. Springer, DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  61. Krott M, Aurenhammer H, Bader A, Devkota RR, Maryudi A, Schusser C (2011) Actor-centered power analysis for identifying the political potential of stakeholders. (2011 in review)Google Scholar
  62. Kuhn TS (1962) The structure of scientific revolutions. University of Chicago Press, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  63. Lambin EF, Meyfroidt P (2010) Land use transitions: socio-ecological feedback versus socio-economic change. Land Use Policy 27(2):108–118CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Leys C (1996) The rise and fall of development theory. James Currey, LondonGoogle Scholar
  65. Long N (1997) Handlung, Struktur und Schnittstelle: Theoretische Reflexionen. In: Bierschenk T, Elwert G (eds) Entwicklung und ihre Folgen: Ergebnisse empirischer Untersuchungen in Afrika. 2. Auflage. Campus Verlag, Frankfut/Main/New York, pp 217–248Google Scholar
  66. Lukes S (1974) Power: a radical view. Macmillan, LondonGoogle Scholar
  67. Malla YB (2009) Community forestry: past, present and thoughts for the future. In: CFIW (ed) Thinking globally – acting locally, community forestry in the international arena. Proceedings of the community international workshop, 15–18 September 2009, Pokhara, pp 8–9, 38–45Google Scholar
  68. Mandel E (1973) Ten theses on the social and economic laws governing the society transitional between capitalism and socialism. In: Hennicke P (ed) Probleme des Sozialismus und der Übergangsgesellschaften. Suhrkamp, Frankfurt/MGoogle Scholar
  69. Mann M (1986) The sources of social power, vol 1. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Martinez-Diaz L, Woods N (eds) (2009) Networks of influence? Developing countries in a networked global order. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  71. Maryudi A (2011) The contesting aspirations in the forests. Actors, interests and power in community forestry in Java, Indonesia. Dissertation, Georg-August-University Göttingen, GöttingenGoogle Scholar
  72. Mather AS (1992) The forest transition. Area 24(4):367–379Google Scholar
  73. Mather AS (2001) Forests of consumption: postproductivism, postmaterialism, and the postindustrial forest. Environ Plann C Govern Pol 19(2):249–268CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Mather AS (2007) Recent Asian forest transitions in relation to forest-transition theory. Int For Rev 9(1):491–502Google Scholar
  75. Menzel U (1992) Das Ende der Dritten Welt und das Scheitern der großen Theorie. Suhrkamp, Frankfurt a. MainGoogle Scholar
  76. Mery G, Alfaro RI, Kanninen M, Lobovikov M (2005) Forests in the global balance: changing paradigms, vol 17, IUFRO world series. IUFRO, ViennaGoogle Scholar
  77. Mery G, Katila P, Galloway G, Alfaro RI, Kanninen M, Lobovikov M, Varjo J (eds) (2010) Forests and society – responding to global drivers of change, vol 25, IUFRO world series. IUFRO, ViennaGoogle Scholar
  78. Morgenthau HJ, Thompson KW (2008) Politics among nations: the struggle for power and peace. McGraw-Hill Humanities Social, New York (a.o.)Google Scholar
  79. Nohlen D, Nuscheler F (1993) Ende der Dritten Welt? In: Nohlen D, Nuscheler F (eds) Handbuch der Dritten Welt. 3. Auflage. J.H.W. Dietz Nachf., BonnGoogle Scholar
  80. North DC (1990) Institutions, institutional change and economic performance. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  81. Novy A (2005) Entwicklung gestalten. Gesellschaftsveränderung in der Einen Welt. 3. Auflage. Brandes & Aspel/Südwind, Frankfurt am MainGoogle Scholar
  82. Nuscheler F (2005) Entwicklungspolitik. (Development policy) 6. Auflage. Dietz, BonnGoogle Scholar
  83. Obrecht A (2004) Zur Systematik der sozio-kulturellen Transformationsforschung. In: Obrecht A (ed) Wozu forschen? Wozu entwickeln? Möglichkeiten und Grenzen der soziologischen Forschung für eine partizipative Entwicklungszusammenarbeit. Brandes & Apsel, Frankfurt/Main, pp 15–98Google Scholar
  84. OECD (2000) Official development assistance to forestry 1973-98. (Available also: http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/11/62/6877062.pdf. Accessed 31 May 2011)
  85. Ojha HR (2009) Science, bureaucracy and politics: the dynamics of community forestry evolution in Nepal. In: CFIW (ed) Thinking globally – acting locally, community forestry in the international arena. Proceedings of the community international workshop, September 15–18, 2009, Pokhara, p 93 & CD-ROMGoogle Scholar
  86. Palo M, Lehto E (2012) Private or socialistic forestry? Forest transition in Finland vs. deforestation in the tropics, vol 10, World forests. Springer, DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  87. Palo M, Uusivuori J (eds) (1999) World forests, society and environment, vol 1, World forests. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht/London/BostonGoogle Scholar
  88. Pelikan JM, Halbmayer E (2000) Gesundheitswissenschaftliche Grundlagen zur Strategie des gesundheitsfördernden Krankenhauses. In: Pelikan JM, Halbmayer E (eds) Das gesundheitsfördernde Krankenhaus. Konzepte und Beispiele zur Entwicklung einer lernenden Organisation. Juventa, Weinheim, pp 13–36Google Scholar
  89. Persson R (2003) Assistance to forestry, experiences and potential for improvements, CIFOR, Bogor Barat, IndonesiaGoogle Scholar
  90. Petras J, Veltmeyer H (2003) A system in crisis: the dynamics of free market capital. Zed Books, LondonGoogle Scholar
  91. Prebisch R (1950) The economic development of Latin America and its principal problems. United Nations/Economic Commission for Latin America, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  92. Prittwitz V (1990) Das Katastrophen-Paradox, Elemente einer Theorie der Umweltpolitik. Leske and Budrich, OpladenGoogle Scholar
  93. Rittberger V, Zangl B (2004) Internationale Organisationen. Politik und Geschichte. 3. Auflage. VS, WiesbadenGoogle Scholar
  94. Rostow WW (1960) Stadien wirtschaftlichen Wachstums. (Phases of economic development). Vandenhoek und Ruprecht, GöttingenGoogle Scholar
  95. Rudel TK (1998) Is there a forest transition? Deforestation, reforestation, and development. Rural Sociol 63(4):533–552CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  96. Rudel TK, Coomes OT, Moran E, Achard F, Angelsen A, Xu JC, Lambin E (2005) Forest transitions: towards a global understanding of land use change. Glob Environ Chang 15(1):23–31CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  97. Saari E (1949) The sustained yield in forestry. In: Proceedings of the III world forestry congress, no 1: General papers and their summaries. HelsinkiGoogle Scholar
  98. Sabatier PA (1993) Advocacy-Koalitionen, Policy Wandel und Policy Lernen: Eine Alternative zur Phasenheuristik. In: Héritier A (ed) Policy-Analyse. Kritik und Neuorientierung. PVS Sonderheft 24, Opladen, pp 116–148Google Scholar
  99. Sabatier PA, Jenkins-Smith HC (1993) Policy change and learning – an advocacy coalition approach. Westview Press, BoulderGoogle Scholar
  100. Sadan E (2004) Empowerment and community planning. Translation of Sadan E (1997) (in Hebrew) Empowerment and community planning: theory and practice of people-focused social solutions. Hakibbutz Hameuchad Publishers, Tel Aviv (Available also: http://www.mpow.org/elisheva_sadan_empowerment.pdf. Accessed 01 October 2009)
  101. Scharpf FW (2000) Interaktionsformen. Akteurszentrierter Institutionalismus in der Politikforschung. Leske  +  Budrich, OpladenGoogle Scholar
  102. Schneider V (2009) Akteurkonstellationen und Netzwerke in der Politikentwicklung. In: Schubert K, Bandelow NC (eds) Lehrbuch der Politikfeldanalyse 2.0. Oldenburg Verlag, München, pp 191–220Google Scholar
  103. Schnell R, Hill PB, Esser E (1993) Methoden der empirischen Sozialforschung. Oldenburg Verlag, München, WienGoogle Scholar
  104. Schubert K, Bandelow NC (eds) (2009) Lehrbuch der Politikfeldanalyse 2.0. Oldenburg Verlag, MünchenGoogle Scholar
  105. Senghaas D (ed) (1974) Peripherer Kapitalismus. Analysen über Abhängigkeit und Unterentwicklung. (Peripheral capitalism. Analyses of dependency and underdevelopment) Suhrkamp (2. Aufl. 1977), Frankfurt am MainGoogle Scholar
  106. Senghaas D (1977) Weltwirtschaftsordnung und Entwicklungspolitik. Plädoyer für Dissoziation. (World economic order and development policy. Plea for dissociation) Suhrkamp, Frankfurt am MainGoogle Scholar
  107. Senghaas D (1979) Kapitalistische Weltökonomie. Kontroversen über ihren Ursprung und ihre Entwicklungsdynamik. (Capitalistic world economy. Controversies about its origin and its development dynamics) Suhrkamp, Frankfurt am MainGoogle Scholar
  108. Shepherd G, Brown D, Richards M, Schreckenberg K (eds) (1998) The EU tropical forestry sourcebook. European Commission, BrusselsGoogle Scholar
  109. Sieferle RP, Krausmann F, Schandl H, Winiwarter V (2006) Das Ende der Fläche: zum gesellschaftlichen Stoffwechsel der Industrialisierung. Böhlau Verlag, KölnGoogle Scholar
  110. Sundberg U, Silversides CR (eds) (1988) Operational efficiency in forestry, vol 1, Analysis. Kluwer, DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  111. Treibel A (2004) Einführung in soziologische Theorien der Gegenwart, 6th edn. VS, WiesbadenGoogle Scholar
  112. van Ufford PQ (1997) Die verborgene Krise der Entwicklungshilfe: Entwicklungshilfebürokratien zwischen Absichten und Ergebnissen. In: Bierschenk T, Elwert G (eds) Entwicklung und ihre Folgen: Ergebnisse empirischer Untersuchungen in Afrika. 2. Auflage. Campus Verlag, Frankfut/Main/New York, pp 121–142Google Scholar
  113. Wallerstein I (1995) Die Sozialwissenschaft ‘kaputt-denken’. Die Grenzen der Paradigmen des 19. Jahrhunderts. Beltz-Athenäum, WeinheimGoogle Scholar
  114. Weber M (1964) Basic concepts of sociology. Citadel, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  115. Westoby JC (1962) Forest industries in the attack on economic underdevelopment. Unasylva 16(4):168.291, FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  116. Wood G, Newton J (2005) From welfare to well-being regimes: engaging new agendas. Arusha conference, ‘New frontiers of social policy’ – 12–15 December 2005. Wood G et al., conference paper, University of BathGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter K. Aurenhammer
    • 1
  1. 1.Chair of Forest and Nature Conservation PolicyGeorg-August-University of GöttingenGöttingenGermany

Personalised recommendations