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An Introduction to Macromolecular Crystallography Through Parable and Analogy

  • Alexander McPherson
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics book series (NAPSB)

Abstract

Let us assume that we want to determine the structure of some object which is invisible. It has the supernatural property that it is non responsive to any electromagnetic radiation such as light. But, to make the example more concrete, let’s assume it is an invisible, cream colored, 1984 Alpha Romeo Spider (curiously, exactly like the author’s). If we have never seen such a glorious object before, how can we learn of its structure? How can we visualize it?

Keywords

Diffraction Pattern Periodic Point Diffract Wave Windshield Wiper Invisible Object 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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    McPherson A (1999) The crystallization of biological macromolecules. Cold Spring Harbor Press, Cold Spring HarborGoogle Scholar
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    Bragg WL, Pertuz MF (1954) The structure of hemoglobin. VI. Fourier projections on the 010 plane. Proc Roy Soc A225:315ADSGoogle Scholar
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    Harker D (1956) The determination of the phases of the structure factors of noncentro-symmetric crystals by the method of double isomorphous replacement. Acta Cryst 9:1CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Molecular Biology and BiochemistryUniversity of California, IrvineIrvineUSA

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