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Challenging Inequalities Through Community–University Partnerships

  • Angie Hart
  • Kim Aumann
Chapter

Abstract

One of the great challenges for effective relationships operating between universities and communities is in identifying where the common interest for a partnership may lie. It is possible to explore that question in the abstract, and list how particular universities and excluded communities may be able to work together. But we have a concern with that approach, that it is deeply impersonal. If you are talking about relationships, then relationships are fundamentally among people. Those people may wish to accomplish strategic goals of institutions with which they are involved, and the wider strategic environment does shape the ways those relationships evolve. But we find a real risk in overly academic approaches to understanding community engagement which fails to adequately reflect the people behind the engagement. This chapter seeks to understand the delicate ecology of relationships looking at a five-year community–university partnership focused on improving outcomes for disadvantaged children and their families.

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility Community Engagement Community Partner Practice Community Parent Parent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Community University Partnership Programme/School of Nursing & MidwiferyUniversity of BrightonBrightonUK
  2. 2.AMAZE BrightonBrightonUK

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