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Investigation of Tertiary Chemistry Learning Environment in Sabah, Malaysia

  • Yoon-Fah Lay
  • Chwee-Hoon Khoo
Chapter

Abstract

Over the last four decades, researchers in many countries have shown increasing interest in the conceptualization, assessment, and investigation of students’ perceptions of psychosocial dimensions of their classroom environment. Research conducted over the past 40 years has shown the quality of the classroom environment in schools to be a significant determinant of student learning. However, not many studies were conducted to examine the tertiary chemistry classroom learning environment especially in the state of Sabah, Malaysia. The purpose of this study is to investigate pre-service chemistry teachers’ perceptions of their chemistry classroom learning environment at the teacher education institutions in the state of Sabah, Malaysia. This study is also aimed to ascertain if there is any significant difference in students’ perceptions of their chemistry learning environment based on gender and type of school. This was a non-experimental quantitative research and sample survey method was used to collect data. Samples were selected by using a cluster random sampling technique. The College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI) was adopted to measure pre-service chemistry teachers’ perceptions of their chemistry learning environment. The seven subscales of the CUCEI measured were: Personalization, Involvement, Student Cohesiveness, Satisfaction, Task Orientation, Innovation, and Individualization. Independent samples t-test was used to test the stated null hypotheses at a predetermined significance level, alpha =.05. The research findings will bring some meaningful implications to those who are involved directly or indirectly in the planning and implementation of tertiary chemistry curriculum especially at teacher education institutions in the state of Sabah, Malaysia.

Keywords

Classroom Environment Task Orientation Classroom Learning Environment Cronbach Alpha Reliability Teacher Education Institute 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Education and Social DevelopmentUniversiti Malaysia SabahKota KinabaluMalaysia
  2. 2.Department of Science and MathematicsTeacher Education Institute-Kent CampusTuaranMalaysia

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