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Enfield’s Brucker and Christian Anti-scepticism in Enlightenment Historiography of Philosophy

  • John Christian Laursen
Chapter
Part of the International Archives of the History of Ideas Archives internationales d'histoire des idées book series (ARCH, volume 210)

Abstract

William Enfield published an abridgement of Jacob Brucker’s Historia Critica Philosophiae (1742–4) in 1791. It was not an accurate abridgement, but written rather as a tool of Christian apologetics, replacing Brucker’s sympathy for skepticism with Enfield’s hostility. Enfield’s purposes included both Dissenter confessionalism and revolutionary politics. Joseph Priestley, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson each drew on it for their own purposes, surely unaware of its departures from the original.

Keywords

English Reader Divine Nature Philosophical Scepticism Revolutionary Politics Earliest Time 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA

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