The World-Horizon in Ideas I

  • Saulius Geniusas
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Phenomenology book series (CTPH, volume 67)

Abstract

In the context of the horizon-problematic, Husserl’s notion of the world-horizon occupies a preeminent place: it is the original figure of the horizon in Ideas I—the work that marks the emergence of the horizon-problematic in phenomenology. This chapter traces Husserl’s development of the world-horizon in Ideas I with the aim of establishing a rather paradoxical thesis: Ideas I both uncovers and suppresses the concept of the horizon in its all-determining sense. Such is the case because Ideas I both marks the discovery of the world-horizon as well as leaves the problematic of the world-horizon largely undetermined. I further argue that the problematic of the world-horizon is left unexplored in Ideas I because the world-horizon is a specifically genetic notion, which in its first appearance is still dressed in static garb. One can thus say that even though Husserl’s Ideas I marks the emergence of the horizon-problematic in phenomenology, this early work procures only a preliminary, and not a conclusive, notion of the horizon.

Keywords

Natural Attitude General Thesis Phenomenological Sense Genetic Phenomenology Transcendental Logic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Husserl, Edmund. 1950. In Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologischen Philosophie. Erstes Buch: Allgemeine Einführung in die reine Phänomenologie, ed. Walter Biemel. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  2. Husserl, Edmund. 1962. Ideas: General introduction to pure phenomenology. Trans. Boyce Gibson. New York: Collier Macmillan Publishers.Google Scholar
  3. Husserl, Edmund. 1966. In Analysen zur passiven Synthesis: aus Vorlesungs- und Forschung­smanuskripten, 1918–1926, ed. Margot Fleischer. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  4. Husserl, Edmund. 1976. In Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologischen Philosophie. Erstes Buch: Allgemeine Einführung in die reine Phänomenologie, ed. Karl Schuhmann. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  5. Husserl, Edmund. 1983. Ideas pertaining to a pure phenomenology and to a phenomenological philosophy. First book: General introduction to a pure phenomenology. Trans. F. Kersten. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Saulius Geniusas
    • 1
  1. 1.PhilosophyChinese University of Hong KongHong KongChina

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