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VGI in Education: From K-12 to Graduate Studies

  • Thomas Bartoschek
  • Carsten Keßler

Abstract

Volunteered geographic information (VGI) is making its way into an increasing number of fields within geographic information science. This development has raised a need to cover VGI at various educational levels, which has led to a number of new classes on VGI ranging from elementary through secondary school to undergraduate and graduate university curricula. In this chapter, we give an overview of the state of the art of VGI in education at these different levels. We outline different ways of introducing VGI in class. Specifically, we have investigated the long-term effects of using VGI in education to find out whether students who have come across VGI in class remain interested in the topic and engage in the communities. For this purpose, we have created a survey that was circulated among students of past VGI classes at different levels. The evaluation of the 202 completed surveys gives an overview of motivations and impediments with respect to different VGI platforms. We conclude with recommendations for the future development of curricula covering volunteered geographic information.

Keywords

Geographic Information System High School Student Volunteer Geographic Information Geospatial Technology Related Work Section 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for GeoinformaticsUniversity of MünsterMünsterGermany

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