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An Analysis of Chromosome Pairing Behaviour in Newly Synthesized Alfalfa Tetraploids by Means of SSR Markers

  • D. Rosellini
  • N. Ferradini
  • S. Allegrucci
  • A. Nicolia
  • F. Veronesi
Conference paper

Abstract

A duplication of a species’ chromosomes results in the formation of a polyploid with polysomic inheritance, or autopolyploid, while the union of the genomes of different species results in the formation of a polyploid with disomic inheritance, or allopolyploid. Cultivated alfalfa shows polysomic (tetrasomic) inheritance; however, no information of chromosome pairing behaviour is available for newly tetraploidized M. sativa. We are studying two tetraploid plants obtained by bilateral sexual polyploidization, that is, by crossing a diploid Medicago sativa subsp. falcata plant that produces 2n eggs (PG-F9) with a 2x Medicago sativa. subsp. coerulea x falcata plant that produces 2n pollen (12P). We are employing SSR markers to investigate the chromosome pairing behaviour of these two plants. They were crossed with an unrelated tetraploid pollen donor, and parental SSR allele segregation patterns are examined in the two progenies. Our results so far, indicate that random pairing, and consequently tetrasomic inheritance, is the rule in newly tetraploidized M. sativa.

Keywords

Sexual Polyploidization Second Division Restitution Division Restitution Tetrasomic Inheritance Disomic Inheritance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

Funding was provided by the Italian Ministry of University and Science, project: Sexual polyploidization in alfalfa: insight into gene expression changes in newly synthesized tetraploids, PRIN 2008 (prot. 2008AEAXRK_001, PI Fabio Veronesi).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Rosellini
    • 1
  • N. Ferradini
    • 1
  • S. Allegrucci
    • 1
  • A. Nicolia
    • 1
  • F. Veronesi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied BiologyUniversity of PerugiaPerugiaItalia

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