Advanced Methods for Controlling Insect Pests in Dry Food

Chapter

Abstract

Methyl bromide (MB) and Phosphine were the most widely used fumigants for controlling insect pest infestation in grain, dry food products and quarantine insects in cut flowers. Lately, the phase out of MB in developed countries, Phosphine became a major fumigant for the control of stored product insects. However, limitations, such as low temperature and relatively long exposure time, limit its use. This situation made it urgent to search for new techniques to improve the fumigation with Phosphine and for alternative environmentally sound and cost effective control agents. In order to improve Phosphine application a special device, containing a heater and a ventilator, called “Speedbox”, was evaluated. In addition, the potential use of essential oils as botanical fumigants obtained from aromatic plants, and the use of Diatomaceous Earth as grain protectant were evaluated against major stored product insects.

Keywords

Diatomaceous Earth Aromatic Plant Methyl Bromide Methyl Bromide Progeny Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Food Quality and Safety, Agricultural Research OrganizationThe Volcani CenterBet DaganIsrael

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