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Statistical Indices for the Diagnosing and Detecting Changes in Extremes

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Extremes in a Changing Climate

Part of the book series: Water Science and Technology Library ((WSTL,volume 65))

Abstract

This chapter introduces statistical indices that have been used to quantify the past changes in weather and climate extremes. These indices can also be used to assess changes in future extremes as projected by climate models. We also present examples in which the influence of anthropogenic climate change has been identified on extreme daily temperature, extreme daily precipitation, and the probability of occurrence for a specific extreme event.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Commission for Climatology (CCl).

  2. 2.

    The World Climate Research Program (WCRP) Climate Variability and Predictability Project (CLIVAR).

  3. 3.

    The WMO and the UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM).

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Correspondence to Xuebin Zhang .

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Zhang, X., Zwiers, F.W. (2013). Statistical Indices for the Diagnosing and Detecting Changes in Extremes. In: AghaKouchak, A., Easterling, D., Hsu, K., Schubert, S., Sorooshian, S. (eds) Extremes in a Changing Climate. Water Science and Technology Library, vol 65. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-4479-0_1

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