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Work Well-Being

  • M. Joseph Sirgy
Chapter
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 50)

Abstract

Historically, research and writing in work well-being has been turf of industrial/organizational (I/O) psychologists, organizational behavior scientists, and management scholars (O’Brien, 1990; Tait, Padgett, & Baldwin, 1989). Work well-being has been a topic that sprung from McGregor’s Theory Y in management. In this chapter, I will describe selected findings from QOL research dealing with work well-being. I organized this discussion to address the following questions:

Keywords

Life Satisfaction Life Domain Workplace Spirituality Workplace Incivility Nonwork Life 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Joseph Sirgy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Marketing Pamplin College of BusinessVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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