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Processes of Sediment Supply to Alluvial Fans and Debris Cones

  • Adrian Harvey
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Global Change Research book series (AGLO, volume 47)

Abstract

Debris cones and alluvial fans involve a range of landform sizes from individual debris-flow lobes, through debris cones and “classic” alluvial fans, to enormous fluvial “megafans” (Harvey 2011). Within the context of this book the focus is on the intermediate scale, debris cones to “classic alluvial fans”. Such landforms are found in three main settings (Harvey 2010): mountain-front, intra-montane, and tributary-junction settings. They occur in all climatic environments, but again, within the context of this book the focus is on dry-region, and temperate upland and mountain environments.

Keywords

Debris Flow Last Glacial Maximum Sediment Supply Fluvial Process Hyperconcentrated Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

In this chapter, I have relied on my own published work, some of which could not have been done without the cooperation of my co-authors, particularly Richard Chiverrell, Gez Foster, Elizabeth Maher/Whitfield, Anne Mather, Pablo Silva, Martin Stokes, Steve Wells, Peter Wigand. I also thank Sandra Mather of the cartographics section of the School of Environmental Sciences/Geography of the University of Liverpool for assistance in preparing the illustrations.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Environmental Sciences (Geography)University of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK

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