Pragmatism, Inquiry, and Design: A Dynamic Approach

Chapter
Part of the Cellular Origin, Life in Extreme Habitats and Astrobiology book series (COLE, volume 23)

Abstract

There is an underappreciated affinity between the Daniel C. Dennett’s account of the evolution of intelligence and design and the theory of inquiry developed by American pragmatists, such as Charles Sanders Peirce and John Dewey. This pragmatic theory of inquiry has its basis in homeostasis and allostasis. This biological basis serves as a dynamic platform for sophisticated technoscientific inquiry through which humans produce designs of their own as well as retroactively learn of design in nature.

Keywords

Natural Selection Scientific Explanation Dynamic System Theory Mother Nature Pragmatic Consideration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophySouthern Illinois UniversityCarbondaleUSA

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