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Workplace Violence and Aggression: When You Do Not Want Your Company on the News

  • Joel H. Neuman
Chapter
Part of the International Handbooks of Quality-of-Life book series (IHQL)

Abstract

This chapter provides a history and overview of workplace violence and aggression research and a detailed description of the nature and prevalence of this phenomenon. This includes a discussion of both physical (fatal and nonfatal) and nonphysical (verbal, psychological, emotional) forms of aggression as well as a discussion about the substantial individual and organizational costs (both human and financial) associated with aggressive workplace behavior. In addition, I describe the individual, social, and situational causes of workplace aggression and violence and offer several approaches for the prevention and management of this problem. Embedded in this discussion, I raise several ethical concerns that must be addressed in dealing with these issues.

Keywords

Work Setting Physical Assault Abusive Supervision Workplace Bully Workplace Violence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of BusinessState University of New York at New PaltzNew PaltzUSA

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