Advertisement

A Different Road: The Life and Writings of Soseki Natsume as a Struggle for Modern Accommodation

  • Lynda Stone
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Philosophies and Theories in Education book series (COPT, volume 1)

Abstract

This chapter provides a broader context for issues and themes that recur in this book as a whole. The discussion begins with reference to a woodblock print by the modern master, Un’ichi Hiratsuka. This sets the scene for a reflection on the writings of Soseki—with particular reference to the exploration in his novels of the profound changes Japan underwent during the Meiji restoration. The essay examines especially the teacher figures in Soseki’s work, and through this it explores such matters as accommodation with the West, the semblance of a Western lifestyle, shifts in generational relationships, and tensions between urban and rural life. The reading of Soseki is oriented by questions concerning the reception of other cultures, questions that are plainly central to the ambitions of this book.

Keywords

Ultimate Reality Japanese Culture Religious Worldview Pure Experience Demonstrative Thinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Abe, M. (1990). Introduction. In K. Nishida (Ed.), An inquiry into the good (pp. vii–xxvi). New Haven/London: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Benedict, R. (1946). The chrysanthemum and the sword: Patterns of Japanese culture. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.Google Scholar
  3. Chamberlain, B. (1905, 1927). Things Japanese: Being notes on various subjects connected with Japan. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner.Google Scholar
  4. Dillworth, D. (1987a). Introduction: Nishida’s critique of the religious consciousness. In K. Nishida (Ed.), Last writings: Nothingness and the religious worldview (pp. 1–45). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.Google Scholar
  5. Dillworth, D. (1987b). Postscript: Nishida’s logic of the East. In K. Nishida (Ed.), Last writings: Nothingness and the religious worldview (pp. 127–149). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.Google Scholar
  6. Doi, T. (1976). The psychological world of Natusme Soseki (W. Tyler, Trans.). Cambridge: East Asian Research Center, Harvard University.Google Scholar
  7. Gallery, D. (1985). Un’ichi Hiratsuka: A retrospective exhibition of woodblock prints in celebration of the artist’s 90th birthday. Los Angeles: Japanese American Cultural & Community Center.Google Scholar
  8. Gessel, V. (1993). The anguish of modernity: Natsume Soseki. In Three modern novelists: Soseki, Tanizaki Kawabata (pp. 11–67). Tokyo: Kodansha International.Google Scholar
  9. Hearn, L. (1904, 1955). Japan: An attempt at interpretation. Rutland: Charles E. Tuttle.Google Scholar
  10. Heisig, J. (2001). Philosophers of nothingness: An essay on the Kyoto School. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press.Google Scholar
  11. Hirakawa, S. (1981, 1984/2005). Natsume Soseki and his teacher James Murdock: Their opposite views of modernization of Japan. In Japan’s love-hate relationship with the west (pp. 249–279). Folkstone: Global Oriental.Google Scholar
  12. Iijima, T. (1987). Criticism of twentieth century civilization in Wagahai wa neko de aru. In T. Iijima & J. Vardaman (Eds.), The world of Natsume Soseki (pp. 125–150). Tokyo: Kinseido.Google Scholar
  13. Jansen, M. (2000). The making of modern Japan. Cambridge, MA: Belknap of Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Knauth, L. (1965). Life is tragic: The diary of Nishida Kitaro. Monumenta Nipponica, 20(3–4), 334–358.Google Scholar
  15. Marcus, M. (2009). Reflections in a glass door: Memory and melancholy in the personal writings of Natsume Soseki. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press.Google Scholar
  16. McCellan, E. (1959). An introduction to Soseki. Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, 22, 150–208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. McCellan, E. (1969). Introduction. In Two Japanese novelists: Soseki and Toson (pp. vii–xi). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  18. Merritt, H. (2001). Hiratsuka: The artist and his prints. In Hiratsuka: Modern master (pp. 9–19). Chicago/Seattle: The Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Washington Press.Google Scholar
  19. Nishida, K. (1921, 1987/1990). An inquiry into the good (M. Abe & C. Ives, Trans.). New Haven/London: Yale University Press. (Originally published, 1911)Google Scholar
  20. Nishida, K. (1949, 1966/1987). Last writings: Nothingness and the religious worldview (D. Dillworth, Trans.). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.Google Scholar
  21. Pyle, K. (1969). The new generation in Meiji Japan: Problems of cultural identity, 1885–1895. Stanford: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Reischauer, E. (1977, 1978). The Japanese. Cambridge, MA: Belknap of Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Soseki, N. (1957) [2000 printing]. Kokoro: A novel (E. McCellan, Trans.). Washington, DC: Regnery/UNESCO. (Originally published, Asahi Shimbun , 1914.)Google Scholar
  24. Soseki, N. (1969). Grass by the wayside. (E. McCellan, Trans.). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. (Originally published, Michikusa, Asahi Shimbun, 1915.)Google Scholar
  25. Soseki, N. (1972, 2002). I am a cat (A. Ito & G. Wilson, Trans.). Tokyo: Tuttle. (Originally published, Wagahai wa neko de aru, Asahi Shimbun, 1905–1907, 1911.)Google Scholar
  26. Soskei, N. (1992). The civilization of modern day Japan. In Kokoro: A novel and selected essays (J. Rubin, Trans., pp. 257–283). Lanham: Madison. (Originally published, 1911.)Google Scholar
  27. Soseki, N. (2004). The heredity of taste (S. Tsunematsu, Trans.). Boston: Tuttle. (Originally published, Shumi no iden, 1906.)Google Scholar
  28. Soseki, N. (2005). Botchan (J. Cohn, Trans.). Tokyo: Kodansha. (Originally published, Asahi Shimbun, 1906.)Google Scholar
  29. Soseki, N. (2009a). My individualism (J. Rubin, Trans). In M. Bourdaghs, A. Ueda, & J. Murphy (Eds.), Theory of literature and other critical writings (pp. 242–264). New York: Columbia University Press. (Originally published, Watakushi no Kojinshugi, 1914, 1918.)Google Scholar
  30. Soseki, N. (2009b). In M. Bourdaghs, A. Ueda, & J. Murphy (Eds.), Theory of literature and other critical writings. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Suganami, H. (1998). Japan’s entry into international society. In Meiji Japan: Political, economic and social history, 1868–1912 (The emergence of the Meiji State, Vol. 1, pp. 3–15). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  32. Van Zelst Family Collection and The Art Institute of Chicago. (2001). Hiratsuka: Modern master. Chicago/Seattle: The Art Institute of Chicago and the University of Washington Press.Google Scholar
  33. Vigliemo, V. (1971). Nishida Kitaro: The early years. In D. Shively (Ed.), Tradition and modernization in Japanese culture (pp. 507–562). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Yiu, A. (1998). Chaos and order in the works of Natsume Soseki. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press.Google Scholar
  35. Yu, B. (1969). Natsume Soseki. New York: Twayne.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

Personalised recommendations