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The Progress of Scotland and the Experimental Method

  • Juan GomezEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Studies in History and Philosophy of Science book series (AUST, volume 28)

Abstract

This paper looks into two Scottish Philosophical Societies of the Eighteenth century: The Philosophical Society of Edinburgh, and the Select Society of Edinburgh. I intend to show that they were planned, constructed, and carried out according to the experimental method of natural philosophy, and that it was this factor that enhanced the influence they had in the development of the country. An examination of the minute books, discourses, abstracts and question lists of these societies will provide enough evidence to support the claim that experimental philosophy and its method were the decisive factors for the developing and huge success of these societies.

Keywords

Royal Society Eighteenth Century Established Society Experimental Philosophy Early Modern Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

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