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Higher Education Reforms in Europe: A Comparative Perspective of New Legal Frameworks in Europe

  • Alberto Amaral
  • Orlanda Tavares
  • Cristina Santos
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, a comparative analysis of recent changes in the governance of higher education institutions is presented, using as examples recent reforms in several European countries. There are some detectable patterns, including the concentration of power on central administrators, the dismissal of collegiate decision-making, performance based funding and the use of market regulation as a tool of public policy. However, each national reform presents specific characteristics that in a number of details deviate from similar reforms in other countries. This is in agreement with the idea that “managerialism as an ideology has not imposed a single, convergent model of behaviour on higher education systems and their institutions” (Amaral A, Fulton O, Larsen IM, A managerial revolution? In: Amaral A, Meek LV, Larsen IM (eds) The higher education managerial revolution? Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, pp 275–296, 2003: 291).

Keywords

High Education High Education Institution Academic Freedom Academic Staff High Education System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alberto Amaral
    • 1
  • Orlanda Tavares
    • 1
  • Cristina Santos
    • 1
  1. 1.CIPESPortoPortugal

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