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Child Well-Being in the UK: Children’s Views of Families

  • Colette McAuleyEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Children’s Well-Being: Indicators and Research book series (CHIR, volume 5)

Abstract

The well-being of children in the UK is currently the subject of renewed debate as a result of the publication of the recent UNICEF report comparing child well-being in the UK with Spain and Sweden (UNICEF 2011). This report was commissioned following the result of the earlier UNICEF Report Card 7: An Overview of Child Well-Being in Rich Countries (2007) wherein 21 countries were compared and the UK was at the bottom of the league table. The aim of this latest research was to explore some of the reasons behind these statistics. It paid particular attention to the interplay between materialism, inequality, and well-being.

Keywords

Domestic Violence Foster Carer Family Type Foster Family Birth Parent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Applied Social ScienceUniversity College DublinDublinIreland

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