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Insect Conservation in Australia

  • Tim R. New
  • Alan L. Yen
Chapter

Abstract

Insect conservation is generally a ‘young discipline’ in Australia and interest has developed mainly since the 1970s. The slightly over 200 years of European settlement of Australia have been associated with massive alterations to natural environments, and rapid changes have enforced impressions of the contrast between modern anthropogenic environments and the more pristine ones that persist. They are associated also with Australia having an unenviably high record of vertebrate extinctions and substantial proportions of extant vertebrates threatened. There is little reason to doubt that invertebrates have also suffered significant losses, but these have not been documented in parallel detail. Extirpations of some butterflies, for example, have been reported intermittently since the late nineteenth century (Waterhouse 1897) but there is no historical record equivalent to the information available in the United Kingdom or United States.

Keywords

Insect Fauna Conservation Interest Entomological Society Butterfly Community Insect Conservation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ZoologyLa Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Department of Primary IndustryBiosciences Research DivisionKnoxfieldAustralia

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