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The Development of Buglife – The Invertebrate Conservation Trust

  • Alan Stubbs
  • Matt Shardlow
Chapter

Abstract

The Rio Earth Summit in 1992 was an international landmark in commitment to biodiversity – a new term that the politicians readily accepted to mean all organisms, including the tiny and obscure. The resulting Biodiversity Convention was a major breakthrough for invertebrate conservation. It radically reduced the time and energy needed to convince others that invertebrates were worthy of conservation attention; now bugs were ‘wildlife’ as well.

Keywords

Light Pollution English Nature Brownfield Site Wild Pollinator Butterfly Conservation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Margaret Palmer, Jamie Roberts, Craig Macadam, Andrew Whitehouse, Sarah Henshall, Vicky Kindemba, Tim New and Roger Bendall for comments on this chapter, and of course thank you to all staff, trustees, volunteers, members, member organisations and everyone else who has contributed to Buglife – The Invertebrate Conservation Trust.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Buglife – The Invertebrate Conservation TrustPeterboroughUK

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