Toward a Greater Understanding of the Effects of State Merit Aid Programs: Examining Existing Evidence and Exploring Future Research Direction

Chapter
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 27)

Abstract

In this chapter, we examine the effects of state merit aid programs on student educational decisions and educational outcomes for the policy states. We argue for the need to broaden the perspectives to reflect the interests of students, states, and the country as a whole in order to gain a greater understanding of the effects of state merit aid programs in a context of increasing national need in enhancing student educational attainment and international competitiveness. We discuss some theoretical and methodological issues in studying the effects of state merit aid programs and suggest some future research directions.

Keywords

Financial aid Merit aid State policy Public policy Higher education finance College choice Student success Persistence Choice of major field College access Science and engineering education Academic achievement Quasi-experimental design Difference in differences Regression discontinuity 

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, College of EducationFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA
  2. 2.Department of Education Policy StudiesPennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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