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UN Security Council Resolution 1325, Inclusive Peacebuilding and Countries in Transition

  • Jan Marie FritzEmail author
  • Jan Marie Fritz
Chapter
Part of the Clinical Sociology: Research and Practice book series (CSRP)

Abstract

After inclusive peacebuilding is defined, there is an explanation of United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325 (Women and Peace and Security) and its mandates regarding peacebuilding. This is followed by a discussion of some of the barriers women face in their societies, information about peacebuilding efforts in selected countries and a list of ideas to foster gender justice.

Keywords

Security Council African Union Peace Process Peace Agreement Security Council Resolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of CincinnatiCincinnatiUSA
  2. 2.Centre for Sociological ResearchUniversity of JohannesburgJohannesburgSouth Africa

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