Advertisement

Synergies Between Feminist Thought and Migration Studies in Mexico (1975–2010)

  • Gail Mummert
Chapter
Part of the International Perspectives on Migration book series (IPMI, volume 1)

Abstract

This chapter addresses various points of intersection between feminist thought and migration studies in Mexico from 1975 to 2010, arguing that synergies occurred at these junctures and unleashed potential for change. To what extent did feminist consciousness raising, discourse and analyses contribute to recast the questions posed in migration studies? How did the several phases of migration studies and the emergence of myriad nongovernmental organizations, followed by the creation of government agencies to tend to women’s issues and migrants’ needs, inform debates about women’s responsibilities and rights in Mexican society? By means of a selective review of United States, Mexican and Canadian scholarship and policies concerned with issues of female empowerment through migration (and, more specifically, the impact of migration processes on male and female roles and identities, gender relations and family dynamics), questions are raised regarding the mutual engagements and intersecting agendas between feminist academics, government agencies and non-governmental actors and organizations dealing with migration.

From a gendered and social constructivist understanding of human interaction, the lives of men and women touched by migration processes are examined: those who migrate but also those who stay behind, as well as the wider circle of kin involved in family dynamics. The historical overview of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries offered in the first section shows that academic, governmental and non-governmental institution building were important catalysts in the quest to frame and understand the migration-gender nexus. The second section deals with the central issue behind the convergence hypothesis: the debate over female empowerment linked to migration experiences. Early formulations placed this question in a before/after framework for marital couples; that is, in a linear progression from subordination to empowerment before and after the woman and/or her husband migrated. Later, the debate was recast to encompass complex, convoluted and non-linear migration processes (not just the flows) and to consider women without male partners. It then became clear that empowerment could be better grasped in terms of a disputed terrain where a gradual reshaping of gender relations and of the ideologies that sustain them take place. The final section develops two examples of sites of engagement and emerging gender dynamics in the state-family interface: (1) the case of wives and children abandoned by a migrant husband and the pathways they follow to attempt to obtain child support; and (2) female emigration sparked by domestic violence, sometimes leading to asylum-seeking in the United States or Canada. In these real-life stories, gender negotiations are played out on myriad stages where divergent discourses between migrants, their families, nongovernmental and state agencies are discerned and explored. The conclusions underline how feminist thought and cross-cultural networking have contributed to a recognition—in academic, activist and policymaking circles—of the need for gendered frameworks in order to study and tend to the many needs of intergenerational family units involved in migration.

Keywords

Domestic Violence Child Support Gender Relation Migrant Woman Migration Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Alanís, F. S. (2008). El mapa de la migración potosina a Estados Unidos. Una aproximación al lugar de origen y destino de la emigración del Estado de San Luis Potosí. In F. S. Alanís Enciso (Ed.), Yo soy de San Luis Potosí!… con un pie en Estados Unidos. Aspectos contemporáneos de la migración potosina a Estados Unidos (pp. 53–76). Mexico City: El Colegio de San Luis/Instituto Nacional de Migración de la Secretaría de Gobernación/Consejo Potosino de Ciencia y Tecnología/Miguel Ángel Porrúa.Google Scholar
  2. Álvarez, L., & Broder, J. M. (2006, January 10). More and more, women risk all to enter US. New York Times, A1, A23.Google Scholar
  3. Ariza, M. (2007). Itinerario de los estudios de género y migración en México. In M. Ariza & A. Portes (Eds.), El país transnacional: Migración Mexicana y cambio social a través de la frontera (pp. 453–511). Mexico City: Instituto de Investigaciones Sociales/UNAM.Google Scholar
  4. Ariza, M., & Portes, A. (Eds.). (2007). El país transnacional: Migración Mexicana y cambio social a través de la frontera. Mexico City: Instituto de Investigaciones Sociales/UNAM.Google Scholar
  5. Arizpe, L. (1990). El feminismo y la democratización mundial. debate feminista, 1(1), 109–113.Google Scholar
  6. Arzate, S., & Vizcarra, B. (2007). De la migración masculina transnacional: Violencia estructural y género en comunidades campesinas del Estado de México. Migración y Desarrollo, Segundo semestre, 9, 95–112.Google Scholar
  7. Barndt, D. (2002). Tangled routes: Women, work and globalization on the tomato trail. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.Google Scholar
  8. Barrera, D., & Oehmichen, C. (Eds.). (2000). Migración y relaciones de género en México. Mexico City: Grupo Interdisciplinario sobre Mujer, Trabajo y Pobreza, A.C./Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas/UNAM.Google Scholar
  9. Bartra, E. (1999). El movimiento feminista en México y su vínculo con la academia. La Ventana, 10, 214–234.Google Scholar
  10. Bartra, E. et al. (2002). Feminismo en México, ayer y hoy. Mexico City: Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana. Colección Molinos de Viento No. 130.Google Scholar
  11. Basok, T. (2002). Tortillas and tomatoes: Transmigrant Mexican harvesters in Canada. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Becerril, O. (2007). Lucha cultural por la dignidad y los derechos humanos. Transmigrantes mexicanos en Canadá contendiendo el género, la sexualidad y la identidad. Ph.D. dissertation, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  13. Boehm, D. (2008). Ir y venir: Historias transnacionales, trayectorias determinadas por género. In F. S. Alanís Enciso (Ed.), Yo soy de San Luis Potosí!… con un pie en Estados Unidos. Aspectos contemporáneos de la migración potosina a Estados Unidos (pp. 93–112). Mexico City: El Colegio de San Luis/Instituto Nacional de Migración de la Secretaría de Gobernación/Consejo Potosino de Ciencia y Tecnología/Miguel Ángel Porrúa.Google Scholar
  14. Calderón, A. (2009). Rights in a foreign land. Women, domestic violence, and migration. Derechos en tierra ajena. Mujeres, violencia doméstica y migración (Bilingual edition). Morelia: Secretaría de Cultura del Estado de Michoacán.Google Scholar
  15. Cordero, B. L. (2007). Ser trabajador transnacional: clase, hegemonía y cultura en un circuito migratorio internacional. Puebla: Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla/Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología.Google Scholar
  16. Córdova, R., Núñez, C., & Skerritt, D. (2008). Migración internacional, crisis agrícola y transformaciones culturales en la región central de Veracruz. Mexico City: Universidad Veracruzana/CEMCA/Conacyt/Plaza y Valdés.Google Scholar
  17. Correa, J. Y. (2009). Ahora las mujeres se mandan solas: Migración y relaciones de género en una comunidad transnacional llamada Pie de Gallo. Mexico City: Plaza y Valdés/Universidad Autónoma de Querétaro.Google Scholar
  18. Curiel, L. C. (2002). De esas mujeres quiere Dios. Participación femenina en la reproducción comunitaria y la recreación de la costumbre en San Miguel Tlacotepec, Oaxaca. Master’s thesis presented to Centro de Investigación y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social-Occidente, Guadalajara.Google Scholar
  19. D’Aubeterre, M. E. (2000a). Arbitraje y adjudicación de conflictos conyugales en una comunidad de transmigrantes originarios del estado de Puebla. In L. Binford & M. E. D’Aubeterre (Eds.), Conflictos migratorios transnacionales y respuestas comunitarias (pp. 115–145). Puebla: Gobierno del Estado de Puebla/Consejo Estatal de Población/Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla/H. Ayuntamiento del Municipio de Puebla/Sociedad Cultural Urbavista.Google Scholar
  20. D’Aubeterre, M. E. (2000b). El pago de la novia. Zamora: El Colegio de Michoacán/Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla.Google Scholar
  21. D’Aubeterre, M. E. (2000c). Mujeres y espacio social transnacional: Maniobras para renegociar el vínculo conyugal. In D. Barrera Bassols & C. Oehmichen (Eds.), Migración y relaciones de género en México (pp. 63–85). Mexico City: Grupo Interdisciplinario sobre Mujer, Trabajo y Pobreza/Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas, UNAM.Google Scholar
  22. D’Aubeterre, M. E. (2007). Aquí respetamos a nuestros esposos: Migración masculina, conyugalidad y trabajo femenino en una comunidad de origen nahua del estado de Puebla. In M. Ariza & A. Portes (Eds.), El país transnacional: Migración Mexicana y cambio social a través de la frontera (pp. 513–544). Mexico City: Instituto de Investigaciones Sociales/UNAM.Google Scholar
  23. Dinerman, I. R. (1982). Migrants and stay-at-homes: A comparative study of rural migration from Michoacán, Mexico (Monographs Series, 5). La Jolla: Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, University of California, San Diego.Google Scholar
  24. Donato, K. M., Gabaccia, D., Holdaway, J., Manalansan, M. I. V., & Pessar, P. (2006). A glass half full? Gender in migration studies. International Migration Review, 40(153), 3–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Dreby, J. (2006). Honor and virtue. Mexican parenting in the transnational context. Gender and Society, 20(1), 32–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Dreby, J. (2010). Divided by borders. Mexican migrants and their children. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  27. Espinosa, V. (1998). El dilema del retorno. Migración, género y sentido de pertenencia en un contexto transnacional. Zamora: El Colegio de Michoacán.Google Scholar
  28. Fagetti, A. (2000). Mujeres abandonadas: desafíos y vivencias. In D. Barrera Bassols & C. Oehmichen Bazan (Eds.), Migración y relaciones de género en México (pp. 119–134). Mexico City: Grupo Interdisciplinario sobre Mujer, Trabajo y Pobreza/Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas, UNAM.Google Scholar
  29. Fernández, A. (1998). Estudios sobre las mujeres, el género y el feminismo. Nueva Antropología, 16(54), 79–95.Google Scholar
  30. Frias, S. M. (2009). Gender, the state and patriarchy. Partner violence in Mexico. Saarbrücken: VDM Verlag Dr. Müller.Google Scholar
  31. García, B., & De Oliveira, O. (1994). Trabajo femenino y vida familiar en México. Mexico City: El Colegio de México.Google Scholar
  32. García, B., Camarena, R. M., & Salas, G. (1999). Mujeres y relaciones de género en los estudios de población. In B. García (Ed.), Mujer, género y población en México (pp. 19–60). Mexico City: El Colegio de México.Google Scholar
  33. Goldring, L. (1996). Gendered memory: reconstructions of the village by Mexican transnational migrants. In M. DuPuis & P. Vandergeest (Eds.), Creating the countryside: The politics of rural and environmental discourse (pp. 303–329). Philadelphia: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
  34. González-López, G. (2005). Erotic journeys: Mexican immigrants and their sex lives. Berkeley: University of California.Google Scholar
  35. González de la Rocha, M. (1993). El poder de la ausencia: Mujeres y migración en una ­comunidad de los Altos de Jalisco. In J. Tapia Santamaría (Ed.), Realidades regionales de la crisis nacional (pp. 317–334). Zamora: El Colegio de Michoacán.Google Scholar
  36. Griffith, D. (2002). El avance de capital y los procesos laborales que no dependen del mercado. Relaciones, 23(90), 17–53.Google Scholar
  37. Gutmann, M. C. (1996). The meanings of macho: Being a man in Mexico City. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  38. Hellman, J. A. (2008). The world of Mexican migrants: The rock and the hard place. New York: The New Press.Google Scholar
  39. Hirsch, J. (2003). A courtship after marriage: Sexuality and love in Mexican transnational families. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  40. Hondagneu-Sotelo, P. (1994). Gendered transitions: Mexican experiences of immigration. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  41. Hondagneu-Sotelo, P. (2003). Gender and immigration. A retrospective and introduction. In P. Hondagneu-Sotelo (Ed.), Gender and US immigration: Contemporary trends (pp. 3–19). Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  42. Kanaiaupuni, S. M. (2000a). Reframing the migration question: An analysis of men, women, and gender in Mexico. Social Forces, 78(4), 1311–1347.Google Scholar
  43. Kanaiaupuni, S. M. (2000b). Sustaining families and communities: Non-migrant women and Mexico-US migration processes (cde Working Paper: 2000–13). Center for Demography and Ecology: University of Wisconsin-Madison.Google Scholar
  44. Lagarde, M. (1990). Los cautiverios de las mujeres: Madresposas, monjas, putas, presas y locas. Mexico City: Dirección General de Estudios de Posgrado, UNAM.Google Scholar
  45. Lamas, M. (1990). Editorial. debate feminista, 1(1), 1–5.Google Scholar
  46. Lamas, M., Martínez, A., Tarrés, M. L., & Tuñón, E. (1995). Building bridges: The growth of popular feminism in Mexico. In A. Basu (Ed.), The challenges of local feminism: Women’s movements in global perspective (pp. 324–347). Boulder: Westview Press.Google Scholar
  47. Lau, A. (2002). “El nuevo movimiento feminista mexicano a fines del milenio.” In E. Bartra, A. M. Fernández, & A. Lau (Eds.), Feminismo en México, ayer y hoy (pp. 11–41). Mexico City: Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Colección Molinos de Viento No. 130.Google Scholar
  48. López, G. (2008, October). El síndrome de Penélope. Salud emocional, depresión y ansiedad de mujeres de migrantes. Unpublished paper presented at the Encounter/Workshop Women and migration: the emotional costs (Encuentro Taller mujer y migración, los costos emocionales.), Mexico City.Google Scholar
  49. Macías, A. (1982). Against all odds: The feminist movement in Mexico to 1940. Westport: Connecticut Greenwood.Google Scholar
  50. Maldonado, C., & Artía, P. (2004). “Now we are awake”: Women’s political participation in the Oaxacan Indigenous Binational Front. In J. A. Fox & G. Rivera-Salgado (Eds.), Indigenous Mexican migrants in the United States (pp. 525–538). San Diego: Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies/Center for Comparative Immigration Studies/University of California.Google Scholar
  51. Malkin, V. (1999). La reproducción de relaciones de género en la comunidad de migrantes ­mexicanos en New Rochelle, Nueva York. In G. Mummert (Ed.), Fronteras fragmentadas (pp. 475–496). Zamora: El Colegio de Michoacán/Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo del Estado de Michoacán.Google Scholar
  52. Malkin, V. (2004). We go to get ahead: Gender and status in two Mexican migrant communities. Latin American Perspectives, 31(5), 75–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Mancillas, C., & Rodríguez, D. (2009). Muy cerca pero a la distancia: Transiciones familiares en una comunidad poblana de migrantes. Migraciones Internacionales, 5(1), 35–64.Google Scholar
  54. Marroni, M. G. (2009). Frontera perversa, familias fracturadas. Los indocumentados mexicanos y el sueño americano. Mexico City: BUAP-GIMTRAP.Google Scholar
  55. Martínez, D. T. (2008). Tan lejos y tan cerca: la dinámica de los grupos familiares de migrantes desde una localidad michoacana en el contexto transnacional. PhD dissertation, CIESAS, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  56. Montoya, E. (2008). Remesas, género e inversión productiva. Los negocios remeseros, las mujeres jaiberas en Pamlico, Carolina del Norte y el costo social de la migración en una localidad sinaloense, Gabriel Leyva Solano. Culiacán: El Colegio de Sinaloa.Google Scholar
  57. Mueller, R. E. (2005). Mexican immigrants and temporary residents in Canada: Current knowledge and future research. Migraciones Internacionales, 3(1), 32–56.Google Scholar
  58. Mummert, G. (1988). Mujeres de migrantes y mujeres migrantes de Michoacán: Nuevos papeles para las que se quedan y las que se van. In T. Calvo & G. López (Eds.), Movimiento de población en el Occidente de México (pp. 281–295). Mexico City: Centre d’Etudes Mexicaines et Centraméricaines/El Colegio de Michoacán.Google Scholar
  59. Mummert, G. (Ed.). (1999). Fronteras fragmentadas. Zamora: El Colegio de Michoacán/Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo del Estado de Michoacán.Google Scholar
  60. Mummert, G. (2003). Dilemas familiares en un Michoacán de migrantes. In G. López Castro & G. Mummert (Eds.), Diáspora michoacana (pp. 113–145). Zamora: El Colegio de Michoacán/Gobierno del Estado de Michoacán.Google Scholar
  61. Mummert, G. (2009). Siblings by telephone. Experiences of Mexican children in long-distance childrearing arrangements. Journal of the Southwest, 51(4), 515–538.Google Scholar
  62. Mummert, G. (2010a). Expert affidavit on child abuse in Mexico. Submitted to the Center for Gender and Refugee Studies, University of California: Hastings College of the Law.Google Scholar
  63. Mummert, G. (2010b). Growing up and growing old in rural Mexico and China. Caregiving for the young and the elderly at the family-state interface. In N. Long, Y. Jingzhong, & W. Yihuan (Eds.), Rural transformations and development- China in context. The everyday lives of policies and people (pp. 215–252). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.Google Scholar
  64. Mummert, G. (2010c). ¡Quien sabe qué será ese norte! Mujeres ante la migración mexicana hacia Estados Unidos y Canadá. In F. Alba et al. (Eds.), Migraciones internacionales (Serie Los grandes problemas de México, Vol. 3, pp. 271–315). Mexico City: El Colegio de México.Google Scholar
  65. Pedraza, S. (1991). Women and migration. Annual Review of Sociology, 17, 303–325.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Pérez, M. E. (2009). Mujeres que se van, mujeres que se quedan. Experiencia migratoria en Tonatico-Waukegan. Undergraduate thesis, Escuela Nacional de Antropología e Historia, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  67. Pessar, P. R. (1999). Engendering migration studies: The case of new immigrants in the United States. American Behavioral Scientist, 42(4), 577–600.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Pessar, P. R., & Mahler, S. J. (2003). Transnational migration: Bringing gender in. International Migration Review, 37(3), 812–846.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Preibisch, K. (2000). La tierra de los (no) libres: Migración temporal México-Canadá y dos campos de reestructuración económica neoliberal. In L. Binford & M. E. D’Aubeterre (Eds.), Conflictos migratorios transnacionales y respuestas comunitarias (pp. 45–66). México: Gobierno del Estado de Puebla/Instituto de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades/Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla.Google Scholar
  70. Preibisch, K., & Hermoso, L. M. (2006). Engendering labour migration: The case of foreign workers in Canadian agriculture. In E. Tastsoglou & A. Dobrowolsky (Eds.), Women, migration and citizenship: Making local, national and transnational connections (pp. 107–130). London: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  71. Ramírez, C. (2000). Buscando la vida: Mujeres indígenas migrantes. Mexico City: Instituto Nacional Indigenista/Programa de Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo.Google Scholar
  72. Rivermar, M. L. (2008). Etnicidad y migración internacional. El caso de una comunidad nahua en el estado de Puebla. Puebla: Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla.Google Scholar
  73. Rojas, O. L. (2008). Paternidad y vida familiar en la Ciudad de México: Un estudio del desempeño masculino en los procesos reproductivos y en la vida doméstica. Mexico City: Centro de Estudios Demográficos/Urbanos y Ambientales/El Colegio de México.Google Scholar
  74. Rosas, C. (2009). Varones al son de la migración: Migración internacional y masculinidades de Veracruz a Chicago. Mexico City: Centro de Estudios Demográficos/Urbanos y Ambientales/El Colegio de México.Google Scholar
  75. Serret, E. (2000). El feminismo mexicano de cara al Siglo XXI. El Cotidiano, 16(100), 42–51.Google Scholar
  76. Smith, R. C. (2006). Mexican New York: Transnational lives of new immigrants. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  77. Smith-Nonini, S. (2002). Nadie sabe, nadie supo: El programa federal H2A y la explotación de mano de obra mediada por el Estado. Relaciones. Estudios de Historia y Sociedad, 23(90), 55–86.Google Scholar
  78. Stephen, L. (2007). Transborder lives: Indigenous Oaxacans in Mexico, California, and Oregon. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  79. Stern, C. (Ed.). (1996). El papel del trabajo materno infantil: Contribuciones al debate desde las ciencias sociales. Mexico City: El Colegio de México/Population Council.Google Scholar
  80. Suárez, B., & Zapata, E. (Coords.) (2004). Remesas: Milagros y mucho más realizan las mujeres indígenas y campesinas, t. 1. Mexico City: Grupo Interdisciplinario sobre Mujeres, Trabajo y Pobreza, A.C. (Serie pemsa).Google Scholar
  81. Suárez, B., & Zapata, E. (Eds.). (2007). Ilusiones, sacrificios y resultados. El escenario real de las remesas de emigrantes a Estados Unidos. Mexico City: Grupo Interdisciplinario sobre Mujeres, Trabajo y Pobreza, A.C.Google Scholar
  82. Suárez, G. (2008). Entre ires y venires: Reposicionamiento en el grupo familiar de mujeres migrantes despulpadoras de jaiba del municipio de Jalpa de Méndez, Tabasco, Master’s thesis presented to El Colegio de Michoacán, Mexico.Google Scholar
  83. Szasz, I. (1999). La perspectiva de género en el estudio de la migración femenina en México. In B. García (Ed.), Mujer, género y población en México (pp. 167–210). Mexico City: El Colegio de México.Google Scholar
  84. Torres, A. L. (2008). Mujeres esposas de migrantes y su participación en los espacios públicos. El caso de la comunidad indígena purhépecha de Angahuan, Michoacán, México. Master’s thesis presented to Programa Interdisciplinario de Estudios de la Mujer, El Colegio de México, Mexico City.Google Scholar
  85. Tuñón, E. (1997). Mujeres en escena: De la tramoya al protagonismo (1982–1994). México: ECOSUR/UNAM/Porrúa.Google Scholar
  86. Turner, V., & Bruner, E. M. (Eds.). (1986). The anthropology of experience. Chicago: University of Illinois Press.Google Scholar
  87. Vidal, L., Tuñón, E., Rojas, M., & Ayús, R. (2002). De Paraíso a Carolina del Norte. Redes de apoyo y percepciones de la migración a Estados Unidos de mujeres tabasqueñas despulpadoras de jaiba. Migraciones Internacionales, 1(2), 29–61.Google Scholar
  88. Vizcarra, I., Guadarrama, X., & Lutz, B. (2009). De la migración: Ausencias masculinas y reacciones femeninas mazahuas. Relaciones, 30(118), 183–219.Google Scholar
  89. West, C., & Zimmerman, D. (1991). Doing gender. In S. Lorber & S. Farrell (Eds.), The social construction of gender (pp. 13–37). Newbury Park: Sage.Google Scholar
  90. Woo, O. (2001). Las mujeres también nos vamos al Norte. Guadalajara: Universidad de Guadalajara.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centro de Estudios AntropológicosEl Colegio de Michoacán ZamoraZamoraMexico

Personalised recommendations