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Kinematics Study of Protein Chains and Protein Motion Simulation

  • V. PetuyaEmail author
  • M. Diez
  • M. Urizar
  • A. Hernández
Conference paper
  • 689 Downloads
Part of the Mechanisms and Machine Science book series (Mechan. Machine Science, volume 2)

Abstract

Proteins play an essential role in biochemical processes. Few years ago, a new viewpoint arose within protein researches, based on the parallelisms between proteins and mechanisms. In this paper the authors present an approach to obtain protein motion paths based on computational kinematic considerations. A potential energy field formula for potential energy checks is presented. Additionally, a normalization algorithm with the purpose of reducing the errors in experimental data and obtaining more stable structures is introduced. Finally, the simulation process for a specific protein is presented.

Keywords

Micromechanisms Proteins Kinematics 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to acknowledge the financial support received from the Spanish Government through the Ministerio de Educaci´y Ciencia (Project DPI2008-00159), the FEDER funds of the European Union and the Basque Regional Government (Project GIC07/78).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of the Basque CountryBilbaoSpain

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