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Steel Corrosion in a Chloride Contaminated Concrete Pore Solution with Low Oxygen Availability

  • Lina Toro
  • Carmen Andrade
  • José Fullea
  • Isabel Martínez
  • Nuria Rebolledo
Conference paper
Part of the RILEM Bookseries book series (RILEM, volume 3)

Abstract

It is commonly mentioned that in concrete chloride induced corrosion is controlled by the oxygen content in such a manner that in water saturated conditions no oxygen will be present and thus no corrosion can develop. In the present paper, experimentation has been made in low oxygen availability “pore” solutions with several amounts of chlorides. These situations may represent the case of a water saturated concrete. The results indicate that at very low oxygen contents, i.e. almost negligible because complete removal is very difficult, corrosion may develop in presence of chlorides. The presence or absence of corrosion is influenced by the amount of chloride, its corrosion potential and the steel surface condition.

Keywords

Corrosion Rate Chloride Concentration Corrosion Potential Active Corrosion Crevice Corrosion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Aknowledgements

The Authors thank the financial support from the Spanish Ministry of Education and Innovation through the project CONSOLIDER SEDUREC of the program INGENIO 2010.

References

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Copyright information

© RILEM 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lina Toro
    • 1
  • Carmen Andrade
    • 1
  • José Fullea
    • 1
  • Isabel Martínez
    • 1
  • Nuria Rebolledo
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Safety and Durability of Structures and Materials, CISDEM-Instituto de Ciencias de la Construcción Eduardo TorrojaCSIC-UPMMadridSpain

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