Continuum Damage Mechanics of Composite Materials

Chapter
Part of the Solid Mechanics and Its Applications book series (SMIA, volume 185)

Abstract

Damage and fracture of composite materials occur in various level of scale, and are much more complicated than those of uniform materials (Sadowski 2005, 2006). Continuum damage mechanics, however, furnishes effective means of damage and fracture analysis also for composite materials. The present chapter is concerned with the application of continuum damage mechanics theory to the damage analysis of composites mainly of polymer-, metal-, and ceramic-matrix. In Section 10.1, to begin with, we discuss the elastic-plastic damage analysis of fiber-reinforced plastic laminates by using three scalar damage variables. In Section 10.2, on the other hand, the elastic brittle damage theory of ceramics matrix composites is elucidated by the use of a fourth-order damage variable and by taking account of unilateral effects of cracks. Finally, a local damage theory of metal matrix composite will be described in Section 10.3.

Keywords

Representative Volume Element Damage State Fiber Direction Stress Concentration Factor Damage Variable 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nagoya UniversityNagoyaJapan

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