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National Accounts of Well-Being

  • Ed Diener
  • William Tov
Chapter

Abstract

National accounts of subjective well-being should be used to assess the various facets of citizen’s well-being such as life satisfaction, trust in others, positive emotions, meaning and purpose in life, and engagement and interest. Although economic indicators have reigned within policy debates, the purpose of the economic indicators is ultimately to enhance “happiness”—subjective well-being. National measures of well-being that are collected systematically at periodic intervals will not only help focus attention on well-being as a major goal of societies but also can give information to leaders about policy alternatives and thus inform policy debates in a way that complements economic analyses. Although global well-being measures such as life satisfaction are useful, measures that are focused on certain target populations, on current policy questions, and on specific activities and life domains often will be most informative for policy debates. Various concerns about national accounts of well-being are addressed.

Keywords

Life Satisfaction Positive Emotion Economic Indicator National Account Gross National Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Netherlands 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of IllinoisChampaignUSA
  2. 2.The Gallup OrganizationWashingtonUSA
  3. 3.School of Social SciencesSingapore Management UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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