Economies in Transition: Revisiting Challenges to Quality of Life

Chapter

Abstract

“Economies in Transition” consist of 31 countries that are in the process of transitioning from centrally planned economies and autocratically controlled political systems to free market economies and democratic forms of political governance. EITs are located in all regions of the world and include (1) the successor states to the former Soviet Union, including the Russian Federation (N = 12), (2) the countries of Central and Eastern Europe that functioned under direct Soviet control (N = 10), (3) the Baltic States of Northern Europe (N = 3), (4) Turkey (N = 1), and (5) selected countries of East and Southeast Asia (N = 5). The combined population of the EITs account for approximately 28% of the world’s total. The present chapter is the third in a series of reports on the EITs prepared by this author since the collapse of the former Soviet Union in December 1991 (Estes, Trends in world social development. Praeger, New York, 1998; Social Indicators Research 83:375–411, 2007). The time-series analysis that makes up the core of the chapter uses the author’s statistically Weighted Index of Social Progress for analyzing EIT development trends for three time periods, i.e., 1990, 2000, and 2010. Data are reported for four levels of analysis: (1) development trends occurring within the EITs vis-à-vis those of other geopolitical groupings of nations, (2) social patterns for the EITs as a group, (3) EIT subgroup variations in development, and (4) development trends occurring in each of the 31 EITs. The chapter identifies a range of policy implications for use in accelerating the pace of development over the near term within the EITs, but especially within the subgroup of EIT “Middle Performing Countries.”

Keywords

European Union Social Progress Baltic State Social Loss Social Gain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Zhou Huiquan (Mary) of the Chinese University of Hong Kong is acknowledged for her research assistance in updating the statistics contained in this chapter.

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Copyright information

© Springer Netherlands 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social Policy & PracticeUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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