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Bioremediation of Petroleum Contaminated Water and Soils in Tunisia

  • Boutheina Gargouri
  • Sami Mnif
  • Fathi Aloui
  • Fatma Karray
  • Najla Mhiri
  • Mohamed Chamkha
  • Sami Sayadi
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series C: Environmental Security book series (NAPSC)

Abstract

The petrochemical industry generates series of liquid and solid wastes containing large amounts of priority pollutants during the petroleum-refining process. These residues must be treated through depuration processes. The bioremediation process, presenting countless advantages in relation to other processes employed, is an evolving method for the removal and the transformation of many environmental pollutants including those produced by the petroleum industry. In a first step, a continuously stirred tank bioreactor (CSTR) was used to optimize feasible and reliable bioprocess system for successful bioremediation of industrial effluent and to develop an efficient microbial consortium for the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. After an experimental period of 175 days, the process was shown to be highly efficient in decontaminating the wastewater. The performance of the bio augmented reactor was demonstrated by the reduction of COD rates up to 95%. Six microbial isolates from the CSTR were characterized and species identification was confirmed by sequencing the 16 S rRNA genes. Besides, the treated wastewater could be considered as non toxic according to the micro-toxicity test. In a second step, bioremediation of a refinery soil containing hydrocarbons climate was investigated. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of bioremediation technique in the presence of the acclimatized consortium to reduce the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in the contaminated soil. Results clearly demonstrated that an enhanced bioremediation was carried when the acclimatized bacterial consortium was added to the hydrocarbons contaminated soil. The proposed bioremediation technology has proved significantly higher hydrocarbons removal efficiencies. TPH analysis showed that 50% of the hydrocarbons were eliminated during the first 15 days of bio remediation. TPH removal reached 96% at the end of the treatment. Further, GC/MS profile has proved that the acclimatized bacterial consortium could effectively remove the medium- and long-chain alkanes in the contaminated soil such as the alkanes were undetectable after a 30-day of incubation period. In a third step, a Halomonas sp. strain C2SS100 had been isolated and characterized from Sercina petroleum reservoir. The strain had shown potential hydrocarbon degradation under halophilic condition (100 g 1−1 NaCl). During growth on n-Hexadecane (C16), C2SS100 produced biosurfactant that could solubilise phenanthrene, a three-ring aromatic hydrocarbon. The halophilic character of this bacterium could add further advantages for its use in marine and saline environments-oil bioremediation.

Keywords

Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Organic Loading Rate Hydrocarbon Degradation Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Concentration Biosurfactant Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Boutheina Gargouri
    • 1
  • Sami Mnif
    • 1
  • Fathi Aloui
    • 1
  • Fatma Karray
    • 1
  • Najla Mhiri
    • 1
  • Mohamed Chamkha
    • 1
  • Sami Sayadi
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire des Bioprocédés Environnementaux, Pôle d’Excellence Régional AUF-LBPE, Centre de Biotechnologie de SfaxUniversité de SfaxSfaxTunisia

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