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The Major Current Interpretations of the Principle of Free and Informed Consent

  • Grzegorz Mazur
Chapter
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 112)

Abstract

While the first chapter of this study focused primarily on the historical origins of informed consent and its second on the articulation of this concept in human-rights documents, the purpose of this chapter is to trace the issue of informed consent throughout the Magisterial teaching of the Roman Catholic Church (first section) and its treatment in relevant philosophical and theological literature (second section). This will provide grounds for comprehensive analyses of proxy consent. Space limitations require that the second section include only the most representative and recognized authors. Thus, the virtue ethics applied to the medical realm by Edmund Pellegrino and David Thomasma will be contrasted with the four-principle approach characteristic of Tom Beauchamp and James Childress, enriched by psychological insights provided by Ruth Faden. The account of Paul Ramsey, rooted in the biblical notion of covenant and classic for the topic, will open the section, while the analyses of Germain Grisez, grounded in Catholic theology and emphasizing the weight of conscience, will close it. Furthermore, the contributions of authors such as Benedict Ashley, Kevin O’Rourke, Robert Veatch, Jessica Berg, Paul Appelbaum, Charles Lidz, Lisa Parker, and Robert Levine will be recognized as appropriate throughout this section.

Keywords

Health Care Worker Human Dignity Moral Character Moral Truth Presume Consent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dominican College of Philosophy and TheologyKrakówPoland

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