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Systematic Paleontology

  • Rivka Rabinovich
  • Sabine Gaudzinski-Windheuser
  • Lutz Kindler
  • Naama Goren-Inbar
Chapter
Part of the Vertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoanthropology book series (VERT)

Abstract

This chapter is dedicated to a detailed paleontological description of the medium- to large-sized mammal fauna discovered at Gesher Benot Ya‘aqov (GBY), taking into account previous paleontological studies undertaken in this sector of the Dead Sea Rift.

Keywords

Skeletal Element Faunal Assemblage Proximal Ulna Bone Shaft Tooth Fragment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rivka Rabinovich
    • 1
  • Sabine Gaudzinski-Windheuser
    • 2
    • 3
  • Lutz Kindler
    • 2
    • 3
  • Naama Goren-Inbar
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute of Earth Sciences and National Natural History Collections, Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of JerusalemGivat Ram JerusalemIsrael
  2. 2.Palaeolithic Research UnitRömisch-Germanisches ZentralmuseumNeuwiedGermany
  3. 3.Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Institute for Pre- and Protohistoric ArchaeologyNeuwiedGermany
  4. 4.Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of JerusalemMt. Scopus JerusalemIsrael

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