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The Impacts of Bologna and of the Lisbon Agenda

  • Amélia Veiga
  • Alberto Amaral
Chapter

Abstract

Viewing the Bologna process and the Lisbon strategy from the perspective of policy implementation, this chapter focuses on the outcome of different beliefs, expectations and perceptions which their goals generated at different levels (European, national and institutional). The policy cycle approach highlights different levels of empowerment. It puts weight on those policy processes that serve as a resource to national debates, stimulating policy change by through their interpretation and application within higher education institutions.

The very short period for submitting the first round of Bologna-type programmes may suggest that implementation was a matter of form rather than a substance. Reports from the European level show Portugal to be performing well within the Bologna setting. Still, they also cast Portugal as a ‘villain’ when it comes to Bologna-related matters within the Lisbon agenda. At the present juncture, to reach hard and fast conclusions about implementing Bologna in Portugal would be precipitate and premature.

Keywords

High Education Institution European Council Integrate Master Lisbon Strategy European High Education Area 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.A3ES, CIPESMatosinhosPortugal
  2. 2.A3ESLisbonPortugal

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