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Introduction

  • Niklas JuthEmail author
  • Christian Munthe
Chapter
  • 1.2k Downloads
Part of the International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine book series (LIME, volume 51)

Abstract

Medical screening programmes are amongst the most debated aspects of health care practices in medical ethics as well as health policy discussions. There are many explanations for this, but a chief one is the fact that screening programmes affect large numbers of people. This, in turn, connects to the history of screening, which is strongly linked to the development of the area of public health (as opposed to individual health care) during the twentieth century, and thus to the use of medical knowledge and technology for societal aims that transcend those considerations that arise in the context of a health care professional interacting with an individual patient. For this reason, screening is an interesting case for the study of what becomes of medical and health care ethics in situations where medical professionals act primarily as servants of society. However, it also serves to partially explain the nature of the ethical controversies surrounding screening and to highlight gaps in state of the art health care ethics perspectives that may be filled by ethical deliberation based on a public health perspective.

Keywords

Down Syndrome Screening Programme Screen Programme Carrier Screening Public Health Measure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Karolinska Institutet Dept. Learning, Informatics, Management & Ethics (LIME)StockholmSweden
  2. 2.Dept. Philosophy, Linguistics & Theory of ScienceUniversity of GöteborgGöteborgSweden

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