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Parasitoids in the Management of Sirex noctilio: Looking Back and Looking Ahead

  • E. Alan Cameron
Chapter

Abstract

The control of the woodwasp Sirex noctilio can be visualized as a three-legged stool. Silvicultural practices to reduce tree competition and stress and biological control using the nematode Deladenus siricidicola are two important legs. The third, and equally important, component of a total control program for this pest is the use of parasitoid wasps. Parasitoids were the first form of control used against S. noctilio in the Southern Hemisphere and remain important, especially as a constant repressor at low population levels. However, there is significant variation in the effect and application of the various parasitoid wasps in different regions. There is evidently scope for renewed efforts to better understand and optimize the use of parasitoids to achieve stable, long lasting population repression of invasive S. noctilio populations.

Keywords

Biological Control Southern Hemisphere Island State South American Country Silvicultural Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Entomology (Emeritus)Penn State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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