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Formalistic Traditions In China

  • Gerard Guthrie
Chapter

Abstract

In the Popperian sense, the case of Papua New Guinea provides a refutation of Beeby’s stages model because it demonstrates that the model does not have universal application. But, with a population of some 5 million, Papua New Guinea contains under one-tenth of one per cent of the world’s population. Arguably the refutation could be of little consequence on a world scale because Papua New Guinea could be rejected as a minor example that is largely irrelevant to the rest of the world; but not so China. With at least 1.3 billion people, China’s Confucian tradition remains a strong influence on Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Singapore – altogether containing some one-quarter of the world’s population. China adds another element to the falsifiability of Beeby’s stages by generalising the refutation to a country that appears very different from Papua New Guinea, but which also has long-standing traditions involving revelatory epistemology and formalistic pedagogy.

Keywords

Formalistic Tradition Examination System Chinese Learner Cultural Revolution Teacher Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Guthrie Development Consultancy Pty LtdBudgewoiAustralia

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