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Formalistic Schooling System In Papua New Guinea

  • Gerard Guthrie
Chapter

Abstract

In small developing countries, a few training institutions without many teacher trainers can have a rapid and long-lasting impact on the school system. In setting up courses, teacher trainers make decisions on type and level of education to be included, partly in response to the style of teacher that they wish to shape. However, tertiary courses that intend to change primary and secondary school teaching styles may be culturally inappropriate if detailed evaluation of teaching styles has not been undertaken and national criteria established. If decisions on courses are inappropriately based on the Progressive Education Fallacy, then all the arguments in this book about teleology and westernisation apply with equal force.

Keywords

Teacher Education Teacher Training Inspection System Educational Change Secondary Teacher 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Guthrie Development Consultancy Pty LtdBudgewoiAustralia

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