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The Concept of “Community” in Catholic Parishes

  • Patricia Wittberg
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter analyzes data from a series of surveys of over 800 U.S. Catholic parishes conducted over a 10-year period by the Center for Applied Research at Georgetown University. She finds a curious outcome: the larger the parish the more likely parishioners were to evaluate the community and hospitality favorably, but parishes with little member turnover and more stability were less likely to evaluate community and hospitality as favorably. Members in the larger parishes, however, were also less likely actually to be involved in community-building and outreach activities. Wittberg thus raises questions about what this holds for the future of the American Catholic parish when almost three-fourths of American Catholics do not attend Mass (hence are not included in the surveys at all) and how to weigh the satisfaction of the quarter who do attend over against the larger body of non-attendees.

Keywords

Stable Parish Parish Community Large Parish Ethnic Heterogeneity Local Church 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Wittberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Indiana University/Purdue UniversityIndianapolisUSA

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