Introduction

  • Liang Yan
  • I-Ming Chen
  • Chee Kian Lim
  • Guilin Yang
  • Kok-Meng Lee
Part of the Mechanisms and Machine Science book series (Mechan. Machine Science, volume 4)

Abstract

Over the past decades, spherical actuator has been a more and more popular research topic worldwide. Due to its advantages of compact size, high motion precision, fast response, direct driven, non-singularity in workspace and high efficiency, it has wide potential applications in robotics, manufacturing, automobile, precision assembling and medical surgery. The fundamental concepts and working principles of various spherical actuators are presented in the monograph. Systematic study approaches on the modeling, design, experimental investigation and orientation sensing technologies of permanent magnet (PM) spherical actuators are the focus of this book. In this chapter, the background and motivation of the development of multi-degree-of-freedom (multi-DOF) spherical actuator is introduced. Following that, the state of the art of the studies on spherical actuators is reviewed. Subsequently, the research objective and scope of a 3-DOF PM spherical actuator are presented. Finally, the outline of the monograph is proposed.

Keywords

IEEE Transaction Permanent Magnet Torque Output Ultrasonic Motor Torque Ripple 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liang Yan
    • 1
  • I-Ming Chen
    • 2
  • Chee Kian Lim
    • 3
  • Guilin Yang
    • 4
  • Kok-Meng Lee
    • 5
  1. 1.School of Automation Science and Electrical EngineeringBeihang UniversityBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.School of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringNanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore
  3. 3.School of Mechanical & Aeronautical EngineeringSingapore PolytechnicSingaporeSingapore
  4. 4.Singapore Institute of Manufacturing TechnologyNanyangSingapore
  5. 5.Georgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA

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