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Connections of Faith: Religion as Community

  • John G. Bruhn
Chapter

Abstract

Much of religion is communal. Churchgoing produces social connections; religiously involved people know more people (Putnam, Bowling alone: the collapse and revival of American community. Simon & Schuster, New York, 2000a; Putnam (ed), Democracies in flux: the evolution of social capital in contemporary society. Oxford University Press, New York, 2000b). The fellowship of like-minded believers also provides a sense of community and group solidarity. Putnam (Bowling alone: the collapse and revival of American community. Simon & Schuster, New York, 2000a; Putnam (ed), Democracies in flux: the evolution of social capital in contemporary society. Oxford University Press, New York, 2000b) observed, “connectedness, not merely faith is responsible for the beneficence of church people” (p. 67). Nearly half of all associational membership in America is church related, half of all personal philanthropy is religious, and half of all volunteering takes place in a religious context.

Keywords

Social Capital Religious Affiliation Religious Coping Civic Engagement Religious Community 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyNorthern Arizona UniversityFlagstaffUSA

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