Case Study: The Veiled Women in the Visual Imagination of the West

Chapter
Part of the Explorations of Educational Purpose book series (EXEP, volume 18)

Abstract

To contextualize the western creation of representations of difference in service of colonial power, in Chapter 7 the author analyzes a specific example of western colonial representation of the veiled Muslim woman and details the postcolonial response and resistance. Western media has collapsed complex histories and identities in order to equate Muslim women with the practice of veiling that is seen as innately oppressive by many in the west. The author engages with feminist readings of the history of veiling and with the effect of European colonial administrations on women’s lives. Colonial constructions of the veil as oppressive and the subsequent policies banning or limiting the use of the veil led to grassroots forms of resistance. The history of western visual representation of Muslim women created by and for western audiences created codes that still carry meaning in contemporary media images. What have those in the west been taught about Islam and women in the official curriculum of schooling and in the unofficial curriculum of the media?

Keywords

Muslim Woman Muslim Country Colonial Power Muslim World Egyptian Woman 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nazareth CollegeRochesterUSA

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