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Demographic and Socioeconomic Group Differences in Morbidity and Mortality

  • Jacob S. Siegel
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with differences in the morbidity and mortality of major demographic, social, and economic groups, such as gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic groups. I consider whether and to what extent health varies among males and females, whites, blacks, and Hispanics, marital status groups, income, education, and occupation groups, and groups distinguished by religious participation, geographic area within countries, and urban-rural residence. Group differences in the levels of morbidity and mortality, and in access to and in the quality of health care, have received considerable attention in recent years in the United States.

Keywords

Lung Cancer Mortality Religious Attendance Socioeconomic Class Hispanic Origin High Life Expectancy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References and Suggested Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.J. Stuart Siegel Demographic ServicesNorth BethesdaUSA

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