Summary and Conclusions

Chapter

Abstract

The more concrete aim of this book is to reframe what Rescher (1998) described as “the complexity of the real” (in his chapter 2). We are of the opinion that this should be done from the bottom up, all for the sake of truly opening the social sciences and humanities (cf. Wallerstein et al. 1996). We tried to convince the reader that we needed a shift of view, of new thinking in complexity about the complexity of our world.

Keywords

Causal Power Causal Network Causal Loop Corner Stone Nonlinear Reality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Education and Learning (former IVLOS)University of UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands

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