Application of TiO2 Photocatalysis to Cementitious Materials for Self-Cleaning Purposes

Chapter
Part of the RILEM State of the Art Reports book series (RILEM State Art Reports, volume 5)

Abstract

Cementitious materials, especially those exposed to outdoor conditions, are directly and continuously exposed to many atmospheric pollutants, (organic, inorganic and particulate matter), microorganisms (e.g., algae, fungi, cyanobacteria) and different weather conditions. As a result, they have an accelerated deterioration process which can produce in many cases important changes in the materials properties, among them aesthetic properties. Colour, for example, has to give a pleasant appearance that should give to the public an adequate perception of the quality and maintenance of buildings or structures. However, serious colour changes are produced on the buildings and structures due to the mineral composite nature of cementitious materials. The nature causes relatively high porosity and roughness, which enable the deposition of coloured organic pollutants or particulate matter and partially facilitate biological growth.

Keywords

Alga Growth Canyon Street Cementitious Material TiO2 Coating Reference Concrete 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 5.
    Benedix R, Dehn F, Quass J, Orgass M (2000) Application of titanium dioxide photocatalysis to create self-cleaning building materials. Leipzig Annual Civil Engineering Report LACER No.5. Universität Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany, pp 157–167Google Scholar
  2. 6.
    Blöß SP, Elfenthal L (2007) Doped titanium dioxide as photocatalyst for UV and visible light. In: Baglioni P, Cassar L (eds) Proceedings of the international RILEM symposium on photocatalysis, environment and construction materials – TDP 2007, Florence. RILEM Publications, Bagneux, Oct 2007, pp 31–38Google Scholar
  3. 9.
    Cassar L (2004) Photocatalysis of cementitious materials: clean buildings and clean air. MRS Bull 29(5):328–331CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 10.
    Cassar L, Pepe C, Tognon G, Guerrini GL, Amadelli R (2003) White cement for architectural concrete, possessing photocatalytic properties. In: Proceedings of the 11th international congress on the chemistry of cement, vol 4. The Cement and Concrete Institute of South Africa, Durban, pp 2012–2021Google Scholar
  5. 12.
    De Muynck W, Maury A, De Belie N, De Bock J, Verstraete W (2008) Evaluation of anti-fouling strategies on aerated concrete by means of an accelerated algal growth test. In: Alexander MG, Beushausen HD, Dehn F, Moyo P (eds) Proceedings of the 2nd international conference on concrete repair, rehabilitation and retrofitting (ICCRRR), Cape Town. CRC Press, Boca Raton, Nov 2008, pp 131–132, in abstract book; 253–259 on CD-ROM. ISBN: 978-0-415-46850-3Google Scholar
  6. 15.
    Fujishima A, Honda H (1972) Electrochemical photolysis of water at a semiconductor electrode. Nature 238(5358):37–38CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 17.
    Fujishima A, Rao TN, Tryck DA (2000) Titanium dioxide photocatalysis. J Photochem Photobiol C 1:1–21, Photochemistry ReviewCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 18.
    Gaylarde Ch, Gaylarde P (2005) A comparative study of the major microbial biomass of biofilms on exteriors of buildings in Europe and Latin America. Int Biodeter Biodegr 55:131–139CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 19.
    Gelover S, Gómez LA, Reyes K, Leal MT (2006) A practical demonstration of water disinfection using TiO2 films and sunlight. Water Res 40:3274–3280CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 21.
    Guerrini G, Peccati L (2007) Photocatalytic cementitious roads for depollution. In: Baglioni P, Cassar L (eds) Proceedings of the international RILEM symposium on photocatalysis, environment and construction materials – TDP 2007, Florence. RILEM Publications, Bagneux, Oct 2007, pp 179–186Google Scholar
  11. 23.
    Hashimoto K (2007) TiO2 photocatalysts towards novel building materials. In: Baglioni P, Cassar L (eds) Proceedings of the international RILEM symposium on photocatalysis, environment and construction materials – TDP 2007, Florence. RILEM Publications, Bagneux, Oct 2007, pp 3–8Google Scholar
  12. 25.
    Herrmann JM, Duchamp C, Karkmaz M, Hoai BT, Lachheb H, Puzenat E, Guillard C (2007) Environmental green chemistry as defined by photocatalysis. J Hazard Mater 146:624–629CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 30.
    Kurth JC, Giannantonio DJ, Allain F, Sobecky P, Kurtis KE (2007) Mitigating biofilm growth through the modification on concrete design and practice. In: Baglioni P, Cassar L (eds) Proceedings of the international RILEM symposium on photocatalysis, environment and construction materials – TDP 2007, Florence. RILEM Publications, Bagneux, Oct 2007, pp 195–202Google Scholar
  14. 32.
    Marinoni N, Pellizon Birelli M, Rostagno Ch, Pavese A (2003) The effects of atmospheric multipollutants on modern concrete. Atmos Environ 37:4701–4712CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 37.
    Peller JR, Whitman RL, Griffith S, Harris P, Peller C, Scalzitti J (2007) TiO2 as a photocatalyst for control of the aquatic invasive alga, Cladophora, under natural and artificial light. J Photochem Photobiol A 186:212–217CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 43.
    Sunada K, Watanabe T, Hashimoto K (2003) Studies on photokilling bacteria on TiO2 thin film. J Photochem Photobiol A 156:227–233CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 48.
    Watanabe T, Nakajima A, Wang R, Minabe M, Koizumi S, Fujishima A, Hashimoto K (1999) Photocatalytic activity and photoinduced hydrophilicity of titanium dioxide coated glass. J Thin Solid Films 351:260–263CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ghent UniversityGhentBelgium
  2. 2.Ghent UniversityGhentBelgium

Personalised recommendations