Developing Teachers’ Statistical Thinking

Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter learning experiences that teachers need in order to develop their ability to think and reason statistically are described. It is argued that teacher courses should be designed around five major themes: developing understanding of key statistical concepts; developing the ability to explore and learn from data; developing statistical argumentation; using formative assessment; and learning to understand students’ reasoning.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of StatisticsThe University of AucklandAucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.Faculty of EducationThe University of HaifaHaifaIsrael

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