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Developing Statistical Literacy in Students and Teachers

  • Jim Ridgway
  • James Nicholson
  • Sean McCusker
Chapter
Part of the New ICMI Study Series book series (NISS, volume 14)

Abstract

While statistical literacy is gaining much more recognition as something that all citizens need in order to function fully in modern society, there is much less agreement as to exactly what is meant by the term. This chapter discusses what statistical literacy is, why it is important for children at school and for teachers, and the need for our understanding to evolve to keep pace with developments worldwide. It explores the potential of new curricula introduced in South Africa and New Zealand, and the work being done in many different countries by statistical agencies to support teachers’ statistical literacy. A case study where naïve students and teachers develop skills by engaging with complex evidence on a topic of real social import is also described.

Keywords

Sexually Transmit Infection Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome Multivariate Data Statistical Reasoning Statistical Literacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SMART Centre, School of EducationUniversity of DurhamDurham CityUK

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