Assessment of Learning, for Learning, and as Learning in Statistics Education

Chapter
Part of the New ICMI Study Series book series (NISS, volume 14)

Abstract

Assessing student learning of statistics poses unique challenges to mathematics teachers at the elementary and secondary level. This chapter describes some guiding principles for developing or selecting assessment items, building on general pillars of good assessment practice as well as important features of the discipline of statistics. The chapter concludes with some specific recommendations regarding the improvement of assessment of student learning of statistics.

Keywords

Student Learning Teacher Preparation Mathematics Curriculum Assessment Task Assessment Item 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Educational PsychologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of StatisticsUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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