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Complementing Mathematical Thinking and Statistical Thinking in School Mathematics

  • Linda Gattuso
  • Maria Gabriella Ottaviani
Chapter
Part of the New ICMI Study Series book series (NISS, volume 14)

Abstract

The introduction of statistics into school curriculum within the mathematics subject poses multifaceted problems to mathematics teachers. This chapter first discusses the relevance of developing mathematical and statistical literacy in schools, and secondly reflects on some current recommendations to teach statistics in the school mathematics and challenges faced in the training of teachers. Then the chapter underlines differences between mathematical and statistical thinking and suggests that, taking account of their specificities, it is possible to generate teaching strategies that allow the harmonious development of both mathematical and statistical thinking in school. Some implications for teacher training are finally included.

Keywords

Mathematics Teacher Teacher Training School Mathematic Mathematical Thinking Statistical Concept 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Université du Québec à MontréalMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Sapienza, Università di RomaRomeItaly

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